ELI Primary Menu

Skip to main content

Vibrant Environment

Mixed Messages in the Corporate World

Featured News & Analysis Article
Wednesday, August 9, 2017

When a public company describes the impact of a proposed regulation, it must consider two audiences: regulators and financial markets. It would like to sway the regulator by emphasizing how stringent regulations could cause job losses or reduce investment. But it may wish to convince investors that the company will thrive in the face of any plausible regulatory outcome.

Private-Sector Governance: Untangling Environmental Standards

An array of eco-labels, such as EKOenergy, certify environmentally friendly prac
By Ian Faucher, Research and Publications Intern
Monday, August 7, 2017

In response to reputational pressures and economic incentives, many companies tailor their product design, purchasing decisions, and management systems to reflect environmental considerations. Because consumers usually can’t observe these benefits in a company’s products or services, firms increasingly turn to environmental certification schemes or “ecolabels” to highlight their achievements.

Cryptocurrency—A New Tool to Help Combat Wildlife Trafficking

Tiger Alliance cryptocurrency is a new tool for mobilizing anti-trafficking reso
By Sara Kaufhardt, Research and Publications Intern
Wednesday, August 2, 2017

The enforcement of wildlife trafficking laws suffers from a lack of capacity in “hotspot” countries to combat the powerful economic incentives for poaching endangered species. However, emerging technologies create new opportunities to counter these incentives for poaching by harnessing the economic incentives to protect ecosystems, natural resources, and wildlife.

Getting Serious About Playing Games: ELI Designs Award-Winning Educational Game

ELI's Cards Against Calamity board game engages coastal communities in resilienc
By Dave Rejeski, Director; Technology, Innovation and the Environment Project, and John Hare-Grogg, Research Associate
Monday, July 31, 2017

ELI’s Technology, Innovation and the Environment project targets the market for serious games with our new game, Cards Against Calamity, a multiplayer board game that explores coastal communities’ resilience to crises. Cards Against Calamity was developed in collaboration with 1st Playable Productions and funded by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

The Evolution and Future of the Oil Pollution Act

Skimming oil in the Gulf of Mexico during the 2010 BP oil spill (Photo
By Sara Kaufhardt, Research and Publications Intern, and Brett Korte, Staff Attorney; Director, Associates Program
Wednesday, July 26, 2017

The 1989 Exxon Valdez oil spill, which released 11 million gallons of oil into the Pacific Ocean, provided the impetus for U.S. Congress to pass the 1990 Oil Pollution Act (OPA), which strengthened the federal government’s ability to respond to and prevent oil spills.

Bluefin Tuna: Critically Endangered Species or “World Gourmet”?

Despite having few natural enemies, bluefin tuna are threatened by overfishing (
By Zhou Jinfeng, Secretary General, CBCGDF, Huang Shuya , Researcher, CBCGDF, Linda Wong, Deputy Secretary General, CBCGDF, and Xiao Recio-Blanco, Director, Ocean Program
Monday, July 24, 2017

Bluefin tuna, the general group name of several species that belong to subgenus of true tunas Thunnus (Thunnus), are the largest of all tunas and have a natural lifespan of over 50 years. Reaching over two meters in length and weighing 200 kilograms as adults, the species is at the top of the marine food chain. But for great white sharks, bluefin tunas have few natural enemies. Sadly, in the last few decades, a new enemy has appeared: humans.

D.C. Circuit Rules That EPA Cannot Delay Enforcement of Methane Rule

A natural gas drilling rig on the Pinedale Anticline, Wyoming (Photo: BLM)
By Robert Kelsey, Associate Editor, Environmental Law Reporter
Wednesday, July 19, 2017

On July 3, 2017, the D.C. Circuit ruled against the Trump Administration in Clean Air Council v. Pruitt, holding that it could not delay an EPA rule limiting methane pollution from oil and gas drilling. The 2016 rule was part of the Obama Administration’s regulatory strategy to reduce emissions of methane, a greenhouse gas roughly 25 times more powerful than carbon dioxide.

Spend Now, Save Later: The Economic Value of Floodplain Acquisitions

By Brooks Lamb, Intern
Monday, July 17, 2017

Floodplain acquisitions offer many benefits. As Dr. Rebecca Kihslinger explained in a previous post, buyout properties can be transformed from flood-prone subdivisions and vulnerable riverfront businesses into community gardens, biking trails, and natural habitats. And by acquiring flood-prone properties, local governments can spare families and business owners the heartbreak that accompanies seeing one’s home or livelihood submerged.

Measuring What is Meaningful: INECE Convenes Discussion Series on Performance Measurement for Environmental Compliance and Enforcement

EPA's Real-Time Water Quality Monitoring Buoy (U.S. EPA)
By Emmett McKinney, Research Associate
Thursday, July 13, 2017

In 2009, the New York Times Magazine published a story about the professional basketball player Shane Battier, dubbed the “No Stats All Star.” In terms of the sport’s most often cited statistics—points, rebounds, assists, steals—Battier was no standout. Nonetheless, each successive team that Battier joined won significantly more games the following season.

Deep Decarbonization and the Paris Aftermath

Implementing utility-scale renewable energy resources will require overcoming se
Monday, July 10, 2017

Despite President Trump’s decision to withdraw the United States from the Paris Agreement, U.S. cities and states, as well as nations around the world, remain committed to addressing climate change, in many cases stepping up their efforts. But even had Trump decided otherwise, the Paris Agreement would not do enough to reduce the risk of catastrophic climate change.