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The Environmental Forum

VOLUME 32, NUMBER 2

MARCH/APRIL 2015

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Landscape-Level Mitigation

Landscape-Level Mitigation

HEADNOTE: An encompassing, region-wide compensatory restoration model, as opposed to localized, ad hoc projects aimed at alleviating impacts, would improve environmental outcomes, speed up regulatory review, and streamline the work of both developers and government alike.

By Alessandra Lehmen
Juchem Advocacia

With a SIDEBAR by Robert Bendick of The Nature Conservancy

   
Sustainability U

Sustainability U

HEADNOTE: Campus environmental initiatives spur investments and student involvement, but often are undertaken in the face of uncertain ecological, financial, and educational impacts. As guidance, institutions should look to federal program evaluation and grant management.

By Stephanie Lavey and Warren Lavey
Potomac Hudson Engineering/University of Illinois

   
The Crisis Upon Us

The Crisis Upon Us

HEADNOTE: Carbon dioxide pollution is about more than air temperature. Resultant ocean acidification menaces not just marine plants and animals, but the entire biosphere. The evidence shows that this quiet change in chemistry poses an immediate threat to humanity and the planet.

By Mark Spalding
The Ocean Foundation

With a SIDEBAR by Libby Jewett of NOAA

   
Testimony | A Superfund Lawyer’s History

Testimony | A Superfund Lawyer’s History

HEADNOTE: I was there when the statutory language was written that the Supreme Court cited in an important environmental decision last year, and I have had an unseen role in its implementation.

By Fred Light
St. Thomas University School of Law

   
The Debate | How the Media (Plus Scientists and Lawyers) Grapple With Uncertainty

The Debate | How the Media (Plus Scientists and Lawyers) Grapple With Uncertainty

HEADNOTE: Environmental law can be described as public policy based on science that more often than not is uncertain. Whether evaluating exposure to air or water pollutants or hazardous waste at a Superfund site, policymakers must grapple with uncertainty. In terms of recent policy debates, climate change, hydraulic fracturing, and environmental justice are all areas where uncertainty rules the day. The public is informed about these issues largely by the media, which convey the decisions and positions of scientists, lawmakers, lawyers, regulators, the judiciary, and NGOs, to the public, via reporting in daily newspapers, magazines, radio and TV, and increasingly the internet. But within each of these groups, journalists regard and communicate scientific uncertainty

   

THE FEDERAL BEAT

By David P. Clarke

The moves came at the same time that data said that 2014 was the hottest year on record.

FAST FORWARD

By Ann Klee

Creating innovative solutions that will deliver clean, reliable, affordable energy for all.

AROUND THE STATES

By Linda K. Breggin

Although the challenges are significant, reducing food waste has numerous benefits.

SCIENCE AND THE LAW

By Craig M. Pease

Why would society knowingly jeopardize a precious and irreplaceable resource?

IN THE COURTS

By Richard Lazarus

Justice Breyer, a cost-benefit proponent, is likely the key vote as the Court rules on air regulation.

VIEW FROM THE EU

By Gabrielle Williamson

The proposal is a major stepping stone on the road to a universal climate agreement.

AN ECONOMIC PERSPECTIVE

By Robert N. Stavins

The result was a compromise between rich and poor to act jointly on warming.

NOTICE & COMMENT

By Stephen R. Dujack

The news on climate change keeps on getting worse and worse, as new reports come out.

IN THE LITERATURE

By G. Tracy Mehan III

On life and the Mississippi River.

ELI REPORT

By Brett Kitchen

Public health and pollution control in gold mining in Nigeria.

RESEARCH BRIEF

By Tobie Bernstein

On addressing the indoor environment.

CLOSING STATEMENT

By Scott Schang

On the uncertainty of uncertainty.