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Securing the Promise of Nanotechnology: Is U.S. Environmental Law Up to the Job?

 
A Dialogue Sponsored by the
Environmental Law Institute and the Project on Emerging Nanotechnologies,
Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars
 
Choate Conference Room
Carnegie Endowment for International Peace
1779 Massachusetts Avenue, NW
Washington, DC
 
May 25 and 26, 2005
 
WEDNESDAY, May 25, 2005
1:00 Welcome and Introductions
 
  • David Rejeski, Executive Director, Project on Emerging Nanotechnologies, Woodrow Wilson Center
 
1:10 Perspectives on Benefits and Risks of Nanotechnology Applications
 
  • Larry Andrews, Ph.D., Chair, American Chemistry Council, Nanotechnology Panel
  • Kenneth A. Mundt, Ph.D., ENVIRON International Corporation
  • Kristen Kulinowski, Ph.D., Center for Biological and Environmental Nanotechnology and International Council on Nanotechnology, Rice University; and Chair of ASTM Subcommittee E56.06 Nanotechnology Risk Management and Product Stewardship
  • John Balbus, M.D., MPH, Environmental Defense
 
2:25 Applicability of U.S. Environmental Laws to Assess, Prevent and Control Risks of Nanotechnology
 
Toxic Substances Control Act
 
  • Lynn L. Bergeson, Bergeson & Campbell, P.C.
  • Jim Willis, Office of Pesticides and Toxic Substances, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
  • Karen Florini, Attorney, Environmental Defense
 
3:45 Break
 
4:00 Utility of Media Programs under the Clean Air and Clean Water Acts, Alternative Multi-media Approaches, Assessment Authorities and Tools
 
  • William F. Pedersen, PLLC
  • Mark Greenwood, Ropes & Grey
 
5:00 Role of the federal Resource Conservation and Recovery Act and State Waste Programs
 
  • Tracy Hester, Bracewell & Patterson, LLP
  • Aaron Goldberg, Beveridge & Diamond, P.C.
Present and Potential Future Classification of Nanomaterials as RCRA Hazardous Waste
 
6:15 Review of Next Day's Agenda and Adjourn
 
6:15-7:00 Reception
 
 
THURSDAY, May 26, 2005
 
8:30 Opening Remarks
 
  • Leslie Carothers, President, Environmental Law Institute
 
8:40 Breakout Group Sessions: Adequacy of Existing Legal Framework
 
Are federal environmental laws and institutions adequate or readily adaptable to deal with nanotechnology? Why or why not? What do we need to know to decide whether the existing structure will work?
 
10:00 Break
 
10:15 Reports from Breakout Groups
 
11:15 Role of Voluntary Industry Initiatives and Guidelines
 
  • Karen Florini, Attorney, Environmental Defense
  • Kristen Kulinowski, Ph.D., Center for Biological and Environmental Nanotechnology and International Council on Nanotechnology, Rice University; and Chair of ASTM Subcommittee E56.06 Nanotechnology Risk Management and Product Stewardship
 
12:00 Luncheon - Learning Lessons from Biotech for Nanotech
 
  • E. Donald Elliott, Wilkie, Farr & Gallagher
 
1:00 Breakout Group Sessions: Governance Alternatives
 
What are the governance options and how should they be evaluated? (e.g., regulation, market incentives, disclosure of information, voluntary guidelines, reliance on common law remedies for harm, contracts, hybrid approaches.)
 
2:00 Reports from Breakout Groups and General Discussion
 
2:45 Summary and Next Steps
 
3:00 Adjourn