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Research Reports

Filling the Gaps: Ten Strategies to Strengthen Invasive Species Management in Florida

Date Released: 
August 2004

Filling the Gaps: Ten Strategies to Strengthen Invasive Species Management in Florida analyzes gaps and conflicts, as well as opportunities, in the federal and state legal framework for invasive species management in Florida. Report findings include prevention policies, control and management, research, education, outreach and public partnership, and strategic planning. The prolific spread of invasive non-native species such as zebra mussels, purple loosestrife, and snakehead fish has captured national attention. Invasive species displace native plants and wildlife, disrupt ecosystems, and cause an estimated $130 billion in economic damage each year. The state of Florida is particularly vulnerable to invasive species. Infestations of invasive aquatic plants in the Everglades and other diverse wetland areas are costing the state millions of dollars to control. If not corrected, invasive species may threaten the success of the ambitious $8 billion dollar Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan (CERP). Filling the Gaps: Ten Strategies to Strengthen Invasive Species Management in Florida is the culminating report of a study funded by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, through CERP.

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