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April 2020

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April 3, 2020
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Co-sponsored by the Environmental Law Institute; Vanderbilt University Law School; WGR Taskforce on Energy, Environment and AgricultureDC Bar Environment, Energy, and Natural Resources (EENR) Community; and Energy and Environmental Law Forum of the Women's Bar Association of D.C.

Go HERE to view the final agenda.

Topics include:

  • Addressing the cost of carbon dioxide emissions via FERC’s authority to ensure just and reasonable interstate wholesale electricity rates
  • Improving SEC sustainability disclosure requirements
  • Imposing exactions on developers to incentivize investment in low-carbon energy supply and energy efficient buildings

The conference will feature the following speakers:

Markets, Externalities, and the Federal Power Act: The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission’s Authority to Price Carbon Dioxide Emissions

  • Bethany Davis Noll (author), Litigation Director, Institute for Policy Integrity, Adjunct Professor, NYU School of Law
  • Burcin Unel (author), Energy Policy Director, Institute for Policy Integrity, NYU School of Law
  • Diana Jeschke, Counsel, Crowell & Moring
  • Max Minzner, General Counsel, Arcadia Power
  • Kim Smaczniak, Managing Attorney, Clean Energy Program, Earthjustice

Making Sustainability Disclosure Sustainable

  • Jill E. Fisch (author), Saul A. Fox Distinguished Professor of Business Law; Co-Director, Institute for Law and Economics, University of Pennsylvania Carey Law School
  • Nikki Adame-Winningham, Environmental Corporate Counsel, Pfizer
  • Rick Fleming, Investor Advocate, U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission
  • Julia Hatcher, Partner, Latham & Watkins
  • Veena Ramani, Senior Program Director, Capital Market Systems, Ceres
  • Tom Riesenberg, Director of Legal and Regulatory Policy, Sustainability Accounting Standards Board

Energy Exactions

  • Jim Rossi (author), Associate Dean for Research; Judge D. L. Lansden Chair in Law, Vanderbilt University Law School
  • Christopher Serkin (author), Associate Dean for Academic Affairs; Elisabeth H. and Granville S. Ridley Jr. Chair in Law, Vanderbilt University Law School
  • Deron Lovaas, Director, EEFA, Resilient Communities, Healthy People & Thriving Communities Program, Natural Resources Defense Council

  • Carl Pechman, Director, National Regulatory Research Institute, National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners
  • Benjamin Wechsler, Attorney, Yumkas, Vidmar, Sweeney & Mulrenin, LLC

Materials will be posted as they are available. For questions about the conference, please contact Anna Beeman at beeman@eli.org

For more information about ELPAR, please visit: https://www.eli.org/environmental-law-and-policy-annual-review

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April 8, 2020
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ELI Member Webinar

Natural gas is described by many proponents as a “bridge fuel” that is less carbon-intensive than other fossil fuel alternatives. However, recent studies suggest that natural gas is significantly more carbon-intensive than previously realized. This is largely due to recent methane leakage measurements that found leakage to be 60% higher than the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) prior estimates.

This is of particular concern because methane is a greenhouse gas (GHG) with at least 25 times the warming potential of carbon dioxide. Studies suggest that due to a high degree of uncertainty in the quantity of methane leakage, if the United States is to meet GHG reduction goals it must curtail methane leakage between 30% and 90%. Additionally, proponents of natural gas are concerned as methane leakage is anticipated to cost producers $2 billion each year in lost product and may result in future compliance issues. Absent regulations from the federal government and many states, NGOs and the private sector are leading innovative solutions to methane leakage.

How are NGOs and the private sector responding to leaking methane and what are the leading approaches to resolving this pervasive issue? Is private environmental governance sufficient to mitigate methane leakage? Could methane leakage jeopardize future production opportunities for natural gas? Leading experts explored cutting-edge practices to monitor and mitigate leaking methane.

Panelists:
Jean M. Mosites
, Shareholder, Babst Calland, Moderator
Richard Hyde, Executive Director, One Future
John Jacus, Partner, Davis, Graham & Stubbs
Theresa Pugh, Owner, Theresa Pugh Consulting, Inc.
Ben N. Ratner, Senior Director, EDF+Business Energy Transition, Environmental Defense Fund (EDF)

Materials:
 ELI members will have subsequent access to any materials/a recording of this session (usually posted w/in 48 hours). If you are not an ELI member but would like to have access to archived sessions like this one, go HERE to see the many benefits of membership and how to join.

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April 13, 2020
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Staying on top of the legal and policy developments in the climate change arena is no small task. As a special service to our members, the Environmental Law Institute provides a series of monthly conference calls with national experts on climate law and policy to keep you up to date and to answer your questions.

SmokyPlanet

Topics addressed in this month's call:

  • Baltimore v. BP (4th Cir.) -- refusing to remove public nuisance case to federal court
  • NRDC v. EPA (2nd Cir.) -- requiring EPA to disclose inputs to model used to justify relaxation of CAFE standard
  • Conservation Law Foundation v. Exxon (D.Mass.) -- staying case alleging Exxon violated Clean Water Act and Oil Pollution Act in preparing for impacts of extreme storm events on oil terminal
  • Massachusetts v. Exxon (D. Mass.) -- Remanding to state court Massachusetts' investigation of Exxon over alleged consumer fraud
  • U.S. v. California (ED CA) -- dismissing Trump administration lawsuit challenging California-Quebec agreement on emissions trading
  • The final car rule
  • The jockeying over green energy and  climate in the COVID-19 legislation
  • Updates on: Florida's climate bill; EV bills in Florida, Utah and Washington
  • New York list week adopted a major new law on the siting of utility-scale renewables, in order to help meet the targets in the New York Climate Leadership and Community Protection Act. See here.
  • Gas tax and transit revenues declining affecting state transportation sustainability and resilience investments

Speakers:
Vicki Arroyo, Executive Director, Climate Center, Georgetown University
Michael B. Gerrard, Professor, Columbia Law School; Director, Sabin Center for Climate Change Law
Robert Sussman, Principal, Sussman & Associates

Materials:
ELI members logged on to the Members site will have access to a recording of this session (usually posted w/in 48 hours). If you are not an ELI member but would like to have access to archived sessions like this one, go HERE to see the many benefits of membership and how to join.


ELI Monthly Climate Briefings are made possible by the
generous support of our institutional members.


NOTE: This call/recording is for ELI members only. No comments may be quoted
or used without the express written permission of ELI and the panelist.

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April 14, 2020
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ELI Member Breaking News Event

“You don’t make the timeline. The virus makes the timeline.” – Dr. Anthony Fauci, Director, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

With news reports changing day by day and government messages coming from city, state, regional, and federal officials, it can prove immensely challenging for businesses and leaders across a variety of sectors to understand the latest recommendations and guidelines pertaining to risk management for COVID-19. In addition to the continually-evolving advisories, over 300,000,000 people in 41 states, the District of Columbia, and on tribal lands are under orders from their governments to shelter-in-place or stay-at-home, and business have been ordered to close in locations across the country unless exempted as essential. Meanwhile, key questions regarding environmental compliance are surrounding companies and firms across a variety of sectors.

What are the prevailing recommendations and orders? Can businesses remain open and require workers to report for duty for the purpose of maintaining compliance with an environmental regulation, permit, or other requirement? How much does the definition of what is an essential business or an essential activity vary from one jurisdiction to the next? What does environmental compliance look like in this changing regulatory landscape? How can self-efficacy be promoted amongst business leaders who are currently facing difficult decisions about how to best protect employee health, maintain environmental compliance, and reduce disruptions, all while responding appropriately to the pandemic? What is the overarching advice of public health professionals, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention? Our panelists explored these questions and provided guidance on how various orders impact an entity’s ability to comply with environmental laws, including how to determine whether a company or its employees are categorized as essential.

Panelists:
Kevin S. Minoli, Partner, Alston & Bird LLP, Moderator
Maureen F. Gorsen, Partner, Alston & Bird LLP
Justine Parker, Managing Health Scientist, Cardno ChemRisk
Rosemarie Kelley, Director, Office of Civil Enforcement, Office of Enforcement and Compliance Assurance, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
Alexander Sundermann, Senior Associate Health Scientist, Cardno ChemRisk

Materials:
There were no speaker materials for this event..

 ELI members will have subsequent access to any materials/a recording of this session (usually posted w/in 48 hours). If you are not an ELI member but would like to have access to archived sessions like this one, go HERE to see the many benefits of membership and how to join.

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April 15, 2020
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Mark your calendar for the Energy Bar Association’s 2020 Annual Meeting & Conference! The conference will be presented as a one-day virtual conference with excellent sessions and speakers.  Discussions will focused on the legal issues related to all aspects of energy law. Attendees will include attorneys, non-attorney professionals, and students active in all areas of energy law, including antitrust, international energy transactions, legislation and regulatory reform, electric utility regulation, alternative dispute resolution, finance and transactions, and environment and public lands at federal, state, and international levels. Each year, the EBA Annual Meeting welcomes 600 attendees and is approved for MCLE credit.

Please visit HERE for complete information and an agenda.

 

April 15, 2020
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An ELI ELI Professional Development Webinar

In the very first Environmental Law Institute Emerging Leaders Initiative (ELI ELI) Professional Development Webinar, ELI Leadership Council member Donald Baur shared lessons learned from forty years of experience in environmental law and policy.

A partner in Perkins Coie LLP’s Environment, Energy and Resources practice, Don has extensive experience in environmental and natural resources law. He previously served as an attorney in the Office of the Solicitor of the U.S. Department of the Interior and as General Counsel of the U.S. Marine Mammal Commission. Don has a special emphasis on water law, wildlife and endangered species, public land and energy resources, protected areas, coastal/ocean law, and Indian law.

Don discussed how environmental law and policy have changed over the last few decades. He also explored how colleagues both within the ELI ELI group and throughout the environmental law and policy sector can have positive impacts on your career. Joining Don was John Pendergrass, Vice President of Programs and Publications at ELI, who shared a brief history of the Environmental Law Institute, the impacts the organization has had on environmental law and policy, and the recent 50th Anniversary of the Institute.

ELI ELI Professional Development Webinars are for the exclusive benefit of Emerging Leaders.

Panelists:
Donald Baur, Partner, Perkins Coie LLP
John Pendergrass, Vice President, Programs & Publications, Environmental Law Institute

Materials:
Donald Baur presentation

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April 16, 2020
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ELI Member Webinar

The Independent Offices Appropriation Act grants federal agencies, such as the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) the authority to issue “user fees.” The Office of Management and Budget (OMB) distinguishes user fees from taxes in stating that the former is a “price charged by a government agency that convey special benefits to recipients […] that are at least as great as costs to the Government of providing the special benefits,” whereas the latter is a benefit to the general public.

Some legal scholars suggest EPA could impose a user fee on carbon emissions, while opponents claim only Congress may establish a price on carbon. Both point to a 1990 memorandum issued by EPA’s Office of General Counsel (OGC) that notes the difficulty regulating the use of fees as agencies may not use outside money to supplement appropriations. Subsequent OGCs have interpreted this as prohibiting user fees for air emissions absent Congressional approval, but the memorandum’s author argues this is a misinterpretation.

What are the legal and practical challenges and opportunities for EPA to implement a user fee on carbon emissions? How might the implementation of a user fee on carbon emissions differ from a carbon tax? What are the limitations of a user fee on carbon emissions? Panelists explored these questions and more as they opined on EPA’s authority to impose a user fee on carbon emissions.

Panelists:
Sandra Nichols Thiam
, Associate Vice President, Research & Policy and Director, Judicial Education Program, Environmental Law Institute, Moderator
E. Donald Elliott, Florence Rogatz Visiting Professor of Law, Yale Law School; former Assistant Administrator and General Counsel,  Environmental Protection Agency
Adele Morris, Policy Director, Climate and Energy Economics Project, and Senior Fellow, The Brookings Institution, formerly Senior Economist, Joint Economic Committee, U.S. Congress
Chad Stone, Chief Economist, Center on Budget and Policy Priorities

Materials:
ELI members will have subsequent access to any materials/a recording of this session (usually posted w/in 48 hours). If you are not an ELI member but would like to have access to archived sessions like this one, go HERE to see the many benefits of membership and how to join.

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April 17, 2020
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An ELI and American University Washington College of Law Co-Sponsored Webinar Workshop

Environmental justice and climate justice are two synergistic movements working to address environmental impacts in communities of color and low-income communities. While environmental justice focuses predominantly on injustices resulting from environmental policy and systemic racism, climate justice addresses future political and environmental impacts stemming from climate change.

Join the Environmental Law Institute, American University Washington College of Law, and leading experts for this virtual workshop. Panelists will provide a foundation for those interested in using law as a pathway for marginalized communities to access healthy environments, even in the face of harmful climate impacts. Participants will gain tools for advancing environmental and climate justice from experts in advocacy, academia, and the private sector. Following a robust panel discussion with experts, participants will have the opportunity to break out into virtual workgroups to engage more deeply on these crucial issues.

AGENDA

2:00 – 2:05PM     Welcome and Introduction

2:05 – 3:00PM       Panel: Community Lawyering for Environmental and Climate Justice

  • William (Bill) Snape III, Assistant Dean of Adjunct Faculty Affairs, American University Washington College of Law, Moderator
  • Kari Fulton, Environmental Justice Advocate, National Urban Fellow 2020, Georgetown University

  • Marianne Engelman Lado, Director, Environmental Justice Clinic, Vermont Law School
  • Vernice Miller-Travis, Executive Vice President, Metropolitan Group, Founder, WE ACT for Environmental Justice, co-author, Toxic Wastes and Race in the United States
  • Michele Roberts, National Co-Coordinator, Environmental Justice Health Alliance
  • Fred Tutman, CEO and Riverkeeper, Patuxent Riverkeeper

3:00 – 3:45PM         Breakout Groups

  • Kari Fulton, Environmental Justice Advocate, National Urban Fellow 2020, Georgetown University
  • Marianne Engelman Lado, Director, Environmental Justice Clinic, Vermont Law School
  • Vernice Miller-Travis, Executive Vice President, Metropolitan Group, Founder, WE ACT for Environmental Justice, co-author, Toxic Wastes and Race in the United States
  • Michele Roberts, National Co-Coordinator, Environmental Justice Health Alliance
  • Fred Tutman, CEO and Riverkeeper, Patuxent Riverkeeper

3:45 – 4:00PM         Final Report & Closing Comments

  • Lovinia Reynolds, Policy Analyst & Environmental Justice Coordinator, Environmental Law Institute

 

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April 21, 2020
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ELI Member Webinar

Enforcing mobile source pollution, such as from motor vehicles, has become increasingly challenging as consumers and industry have turned to aftermarket “defeat devices” that may provide perceived benefits like enhanced fuel efficiency but exacerbate the emission of air pollutants. Mobile sources account for a significant portion of air pollution, including approximately two-thirds of carbon monoxide (CO), three-fifths of nitrous oxide (NOx), and one-fourth of volatile organic compounds (VOC). While the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulates these pollutants from vehicles, aftermarket defeat devices intentionally remove or alter the hardware, software, or other designs that regulate the emissions controls of a motor vehicle.

While vehicle manufacturers utilizing defeat devices grab headlines, aftermarket parts and software are less conspicuous. According to EPA, over 500,000 diesel pickup trucks since 2009 have installed aftermarket defeat devices resulting in the equivalent air quality impact of adding 9 million pickup trucks to roads. Moreover, these devices are prevalent in heavy-duty trucks, light-duty cars, agriculture equipment, forestry equipment, and construction equipment, among others.

What are the major drivers of demand for aftermarket defeat devices? How can the states curtail the demand for these devices? What policy measures is the EPA taking to mitigate aftermarket defeat devices? Our panelists explored these questions and policies to mitigate aftermarket defeat devices.

Panelists:
Jennifer M. Tharp
, Associate, Squire Patton Boggs, Moderator
Evan Belser, Associate Director of the Air Enforcement Division, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)
Julie Domike, Shareholder, Babst Calland

Materials:
ELI members will have subsequent access to any materials/a recording of this session (usually posted w/in 48 hours). If you are not an ELI member but would like to have access to archived sessions like this one, go HERE to see the many benefits of membership and how to join.

April 21, 2020
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A Twitter Chat cosponsored by ELI and the National Environmental Health Association

This year to celebrate the 50th anniversary of Earth Day, NEHA and the Environmental Law Institute partnered to host an Earth Day Twitter Chat. The theme for the Twitter Chat is “Climate Action.”

Environmental health professionals work closely with their communities to ensure the safety of the resources we use every day, from the air we breathe to the food we eat and the water we drink. These resources are being affected by climate impacts. We took this opportunity to initiate a conversation about how climate impacts health and what can we do to fight the effects of climate change and build resilience. Continue the conversation via #ClimateChangesHealth!

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April 22, 2020
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An Environmental Law Institute and Johns Hopkins University Co-Sponsored Webinar

In 2007, the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine (NASEM) recommended the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) follow a drastically different system for testing chemicals in their seminal report Toxicity Testing in the 21st Century. In September 2019, EPA announced efforts to minimize the testing of potentially harmful chemicals on animals by reducing such studies by 30% by 2025 and eliminating most vertebrate testing by 2035. Further, EPA has committed to funding research of alternatives to animal testing at various academic and medical institutions.

Proponents of this shift regard this as progress toward a system of toxicity testing that is more relevant to the human body. Yet others remain cautious of setting ambitious timelines given the present lack of robust alternatives to replace animal testing.

What are the benefits and challenges presented by EPA’s commitment to minimizing animal testing? What scientific, legal, and policy tools will be required to meet this goal in the timeframe set by EPA? Does the current regulatory landscape promote or inhibit the development of these tools? ELI, Johns Hopkins University, and leading experts explored these questions and more as they dove into the potential opportunities and risks of eliminating animal testing by 2035.

Panelists:
Paul Locke
, Associate Professor, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, Moderator
Sean Gehen, PhD, DABT, Leader, Global Regulatory Toxicology & Risk, Corteva Agriscience
Anna Lowit, Senior Science Advisor, Environmental Protection Agency
Kristi Pullen Fedinick, Senior Scientist and Director, Science and Data, Healthy People & Thriving Communities, Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC)
Kristie Sullivan, Vice President for Research Policy, Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine

Materials:
ELI members will have access to materials/a recording of this session (usually posted w/in 48 hours). If you are not an ELI member but would like to have access to archived sessions like this one, go HERE to see the many benefits of membership and how to join.

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April 23, 2020
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An ELI Environmental Law & Finance Series Seminar

Acting as the building blocks for constructing a nation’s economy, infrastructure projects are vital to improving quality of life, meeting the populations’ needs, and boosting economic growth. Green investments and designs offer a solution to advance these goals while simultaneously building resilience and sustainability into public infrastructure. Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) and RELi, a project rating system that emphasizes resilience, are two of the principal green infrastructure rating systems to encourage sustainable and resilient building practices. This seminar on Green Building Blocks: LEED and RELi Systems is the second seminar of the Environmental Law and Finance Series.

Panelists dove into the regulatory process of green infrastructure and resilient design including permitting, certification, and monitoring of LEED and RELi buildings. Panelists also explored the legal facets of LEED and RELi including green building code policy, zoning and municipal law, and liability insurance for building owners. Panelists will also tackle financial aspects of the LEED and RELi rating systems including lease transactions and methods to incorporate sustainable properties into real estate investment portfolios. Join ELI and leading experts for an in-depth exploration of the regulatory process for green infrastructure, the LEED and RELi rating systems, and best practices for executing sustainable infrastructure projects.

Panelists:
William R. Broz
, Senior Managing Engineer, Exponent
Mike Italiano, CEO, Capital Markets Partnership
Melissa Peneycad, Acting Managing Director, Sustainable Projects, Institute for Sustainable Infrastructure

Materials:
Sorry, due to technical problems, the recording is not available, but the presentations are available below...
ELI members will have subsequent access to any materials/a recording of this session (usually posted w/in 48 hours). If you are not an ELI member but would like to have access to archived sessions like this one, go HERE to see the many benefits of membership and how to join.

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April 28, 2020
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An ELI Public Webinar

Fueled by the $25 billion hongmu furniture industry, China’s rosewood imports grew 1,300 percent between 2009 and 2014. With vulnerable rosewood populations in Africa and Southeast Asia continuing to decline, policymakers needed to act. In 2016, the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) passed stringent reforms on finished products containing rosewood. But one of the hardest hit industries was unintended: musical instruments.

In the first quarter these reforms went into effect, music retailers in the United States lost $60 million in sales. Additionally, musicians travelling internationally risked their instruments being confiscated. At the heart of the controversy was that instrument manufacturers sourced their rosewood primarily from India not from the vulnerable varieties in Africa or Southeast Asia. After several contentious years, in August 2019 CITES adopted an exemption for finished musical instruments, parts, and accessories. While the $1.5 billion musical instrument industry faces less stringent regulations, critics remain concerned this change may provide an exploitive loophole.

How is CITES impacting the musical instrument industry and China’s furniture industry? As additional species of tonewoods deplete, how is the musical instrument industry preparing for future regulations? What lessons can be learned for these future regulations? Our panelists explored these issues and the future of sustainability in manufacturing musical instrument.

Panelists:
Jose E. Martinez-Reyes
, PhD, Associate Professor of Anthropology, University of Massachusetts Boston, Moderator
Heather Noonan, Vice President for Advocacy, League of American Orchestras
Scott Paul, Director of Natural Resource Sustainability, Taylor Guitars
Cindy Squires, Executive Director & CEO, International Wood Products Association (IWPA)

Materials:
ELI members will have access to materials/a recording of this session (usually posted w/in 48 hours). If you are not an ELI member but would like to have access to archived sessions like this one, go HERE to see the many benefits of membership and how to join.

April 28, 2020
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Roundtable in the PJM Footprint #16 (Convenor: Dr. Jonathan Raab, President, Raab Associates, Ltd.)

AGENDA

1:00   Keynote Address: PJM President and CEO Manu Asthana

1:45   Break

2:00   Pursuing State Clean Energy Policies/Resources in the Wake of FERC’s MOPR Decision 

    • Chairman Jason Stanek, Maryland Public Service Commission 
    • Dr. Joseph Bowring, President, Monitoring Analytics (PJM IMM)
    • Sarah Novosel, Senior. VP, Govt. Affairs & Managing Counsel, Calpine 
    • Rob Gramlich, Founder & President, Grid Strategies  

 3:30   Break

 3:45   Carbon Pricing in the PJM Footprint

    • Dr. Karen Palmer, Director, Future of Power Initiative, Resources for the Future
    • Dr. Susan Tierney, Senior Advisor, Analysis Group 
    • Dr. Emanuel Bernabeu, Director of Applied Innovation & Analysis, PJM 

 

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April 30, 2020
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ELI Member Breaking News Event

In a 6-3 decision written by Justice Breyer, the U.S. Supreme Court in County of Maui v. Hawaii Wildlife Fund held that the Clean Water Act (CWA) requires a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit when there is the “functional equivalent of a direct discharge” which may include the addition of pollutants to surface waters via groundwater.

The majority held that what is “functional equivalent” to a direct discharge will be fact-specific and a variety of factors may need to be considered, though the majority says time and distance will be the most important factors in most cases.

How long is too long, or how far is too far? This is left undefined and largely up to the courts, who in turn will be expected to provide guidance through decisions in individual cases. These rulings are expected to eventually lead to more refined principles. Furthermore, the majority states that the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) can provide administrative guidance in a variety of ways.

This decision may have created a Rapanos-like, SCOTUS-made standard, which will result in years of administrative actions and litigation. Join ELI and leading experts as they explore the extent of the functional equivalent, and the practical implications and next steps for facility compliance and permitting, enforcement and citizen suits, and potential future EPA administrative actions. Panelists shared how they anticipate seeing this play out in courts, noted the high points of the decision, and dove into the future of the Clean Water Act.

Panelists:
Samuel L. Brown
, Partner, Hunton Andrews Kurth, Moderator
Daniel E. Estrin, General Counsel & Advocacy Director, Waterkeeper Alliance
Royal C. Gardner, Professor of Law and Director, Institute for Biodiversity Law and Policy, Stetson University College of Law
Elbert Lin, Partner, Hunton Andrews Kurth
Hilary Meltzer, Deputy Chief, Environmental Law Division, New York City Law Department

Materials:
 ELI members will have subsequent access to any materials/a recording of this session (usually posted w/in 48 hours). If you are not an ELI member but would like to have access to archived sessions like this one, go HERE to see the many benefits of membership and how to join.

 
 
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