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October 2019

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October 1, 2019 - October 3, 2019
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Sponsors for the event include (complete list available HERE):

Amazon, Intel, Marten Law
Beveridge & Diamond PC, First Solar, Google, Latham & Watkins LLP, Microsoft, Wilmer Hale, University of Washington School of Law

Go HERE to see information on sponsorship opportunities.


GreenTech

Click HERE for a copy of the conference agenda and HERE for a list of speakers.

The next 50 years of environmental protection will not look like the first 50—they will be driven by technology as much as by regulation. Technology is radically reshaping how things are powered, made, and moved. It is allowing us to observe environmental conditions in real time, and to adjust how we produce goods and services to reduce waste and pollution. Technology is not a panacea, but it is an instrument of rapid change, both in the world we live in and in the world of environmental law and protection.

Participants joined ELI and leaders from some of the world’s most innovative companies in engaging with policymakers, lawmakers, technologists, and NGOs to explore environmental protection in an era of transformative technological change.

Drones, artificial intelligence and advanced sensor networks are changing the way pollution and our natural resources are monitored and assessed. Learn about the role of emerging technologies in managing and reducing the environmental impacts of the manufacturing, food production, energy consumption and services sectors. Speakers discussed the legal constraints and opportunities for the development and deployment of emerging technologies, including the societal costs and benefits. Speakers also shared their experiences and successes through case studies and demonstrations. The discussions converged on the opportunities for cross-cutting technological applications with a focus on advancing a circular economy.


NOTE: There are no available materials or recordings from this conference.

 

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October 1, 2019 - October 3, 2019
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Sponsors for the event include (complete list available HERE):

Amazon, Intel, Marten Law
Beveridge & Diamond PC, First Solar, Google, Latham & Watkins LLP, Microsoft, Wilmer Hale, University of Washington School of Law

Go HERE to see information on sponsorship opportunities.


GreenTech

Click HERE for a copy of the conference agenda and HERE for a list of speakers.

The next 50 years of environmental protection will not look like the first 50—they will be driven by technology as much as by regulation. Technology is radically reshaping how things are powered, made, and moved. It is allowing us to observe environmental conditions in real time, and to adjust how we produce goods and services to reduce waste and pollution. Technology is not a panacea, but it is an instrument of rapid change, both in the world we live in and in the world of environmental law and protection.

Participants joined ELI and leaders from some of the world’s most innovative companies in engaging with policymakers, lawmakers, technologists, and NGOs to explore environmental protection in an era of transformative technological change.

Drones, artificial intelligence and advanced sensor networks are changing the way pollution and our natural resources are monitored and assessed. Learn about the role of emerging technologies in managing and reducing the environmental impacts of the manufacturing, food production, energy consumption and services sectors. Speakers discussed the legal constraints and opportunities for the development and deployment of emerging technologies, including the societal costs and benefits. Speakers also shared their experiences and successes through case studies and demonstrations. The discussions converged on the opportunities for cross-cutting technological applications with a focus on advancing a circular economy.


NOTE: There are no available materials or recordings from this conference.

 

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October 1, 2019 - October 3, 2019
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Sponsors for the event include (complete list available HERE):

Amazon, Intel, Marten Law
Beveridge & Diamond PC, First Solar, Google, Latham & Watkins LLP, Microsoft, Wilmer Hale, University of Washington School of Law

Go HERE to see information on sponsorship opportunities.


GreenTech

Click HERE for a copy of the conference agenda and HERE for a list of speakers.

The next 50 years of environmental protection will not look like the first 50—they will be driven by technology as much as by regulation. Technology is radically reshaping how things are powered, made, and moved. It is allowing us to observe environmental conditions in real time, and to adjust how we produce goods and services to reduce waste and pollution. Technology is not a panacea, but it is an instrument of rapid change, both in the world we live in and in the world of environmental law and protection.

Participants joined ELI and leaders from some of the world’s most innovative companies in engaging with policymakers, lawmakers, technologists, and NGOs to explore environmental protection in an era of transformative technological change.

Drones, artificial intelligence and advanced sensor networks are changing the way pollution and our natural resources are monitored and assessed. Learn about the role of emerging technologies in managing and reducing the environmental impacts of the manufacturing, food production, energy consumption and services sectors. Speakers discussed the legal constraints and opportunities for the development and deployment of emerging technologies, including the societal costs and benefits. Speakers also shared their experiences and successes through case studies and demonstrations. The discussions converged on the opportunities for cross-cutting technological applications with a focus on advancing a circular economy.


NOTE: There are no available materials or recordings from this conference.

 

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October 7, 2019
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Staying on top of the legal and policy developments in the climate change arena is no small task. As a special service to our members, the Environmental Law Institute provides a series of monthly conference calls with national experts on climate law and policy to keep you up to date and to answer your questions.

SmokyPlanet

Topics addressed in this month's call:

  • Overview and highlights of the recent UN General Assembly's climate activities
  • Recent announcement by the Transportation & Climate Initiative (TCI) states on program development progress

  • CA Governor Newsom directs $700B pension funds toward climate goals
  • The Baker-Polito administration launched a Resilient MA Action Team to coordinate across agencies in implementing Massachusetts' State Hazard Mitigation and Climate Adaptation Plan
  • NC was supposed to have finalized their ZEV Plan, Motor Fleet ZEV Plan, Clean Energy Plan, and Clean Energy and Clean Transportation Workforce Assessments
  • NM & MN announced that they would be joining other 17 states in adopting CA clean car standards and ZEV mandates
  • Discussion of new developments in the cases against fossil fuel companies brought by Baltimore; Boulder County, Colorado; and the State of Rhode Island
  • New developments in the California/Trump battle and some new Hill activities

Speakers:
James Bradbury, Mitigation Program Director, Climate Center, Georgetown University
Sally Fisk, Assistant General Counsel-Compliance Division, Pfizer
Michael B. Gerrard, Professor, Columbia Law School; Director, Sabin Center for Climate Change Law
Robert Sussman, Principal, Sussman & Associates

Materials:
ELI members logged on to the Members site will have access to a recording of this session (usually posted w/in 48 hours). If you are not an ELI member but would like to have access to archived sessions like this one, go HERE to see the many benefits of membership and how to join.


ELI Monthly Climate Briefings are made possible by the
generous support of our institutional members.


NOTE: This call/recording is for ELI members only. No comments may be quoted
or used without the express written permission of ELI and the panelist.

October 7, 2019
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An ELI and Hanson Bridgett LLP Co-Sponsored Seminar

Communication is the foundation of our interactions, influencing the way information is perceived and the decision-making process. When environmental cases come to the courts, the relevant information and facts include complicated scientific data and analyses. Thus, it is vital to convey the relevant science and the technical information in a concise and understandable manner to make an effective case.

What are the obstacles faced by trial teams when presenting highly technical and complex information to judges and juries? How can a trial technician and graphics consultant impact case preparation and trials? What are the unique challenges and solutions associated with using demonstrative exhibits at trials in science-heavy cases? Panelists engaged in these questions and more as they explored how valuable visual tools – including video clips, photographs, physical models, and more – can help illustrate scientific concepts, best methods for presenting scientific information, and case examples of successful communication strategies. Our panelists explored how to best translate scientific information in court.

Panelists:
Davina Pujari, Partner, Hanson Bridgett LLP, Moderator
Samir J. Abdelnour, Senior Counsel, Hanson Bridgett LLP
Dr. Grant Carey, President, Porewater Solutions
Dr. John Holbrook, Professor, Department of Geology, Texas Christian University
April Tate Tishler, Esq., Graphics, Core Legal Concepts LLC

Materials:
ELI members will have access to materials/a recording of this session (usually posted w/in 48 hours). If you are not an ELI member but would like to have access to archived sessions like this one, go HERE to see the many benefits of membership and how to join

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October 8, 2019
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An ELI and Nossaman LLP co-sponsored 50th Anniversary Seminar

According to the Washington Department of Natural Resources, between 2013–2018 it cost $153 million annually to fight wildfires in the state of Washington. Washington’s wildfires are more than just a financial burden, they are the cause of devastating environmental and human health impacts. Meanwhile, Senators Dianne Feinstein (D–CA) and Steve Daines (R–MT) introduced a bipartisan bill that aims to protect communities from wildfires ravaging the West. Building upon the June 2019 seminar Strategizing Against the Flame: What's Next for California's Wildfires, this seminar focused specifically on the evolving characteristics and implications of wildfires in Washington, as well as effects for the greater Pacific Northwest.

What are the unique challenges and solutions associated with wildfires in Washington? How will the state, and the Pacific Northwest more broadly, adapt to the increased frequency and severity of wildfires intensified by climate change? What are the obstacles and opportunities for forest management including land use, development, and insurance in the context of wildfires? Our panelists explored the distinctive qualities of Washington’s wildfires, the law and policies of regional natural resource planning, and the legal implications of planning for, reacting to, and recovering from wildfires.

Panelists:
Willis Hon, Associate, Nossaman LLP, Moderator
Jason Callahan, Director of Government Relations, Washington Forest Protection Association
Daniel Donato, Natural Resource Scientist, Forest Resources Division, Washington State Department of Natural Resources (DNR)
Maureen Kennedy, Assistant Professor, School of Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences, Division of Sciences and Mathematics, University of Washington Tacoma
Linda Larson, Partner, Nossaman LLP

Materials:
ELI members will have access to materials/a recording of this session (usually posted w/in 48 hours). If you are not an ELI member but would like to have access to archived sessions like this one, go HERE to see the many benefits of membership and how to join.

Reference Materials:
Nossaman LLP Energy & Utilities Industry Group brochure

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October 10, 2019
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An ELI 50th Anniversary Seminar

The management of water in the United States is siloed, and thus incapable of meeting the challenges of water security, sustainability, and watershed health. Nowhere is this more glaring, and detrimental, than in the pervasive disaggregation of water quality and quantity management. The agencies and private sector actors responsible, procedures for decision-making, and even the tools that inform decisions fail to integrate these factors.

Yet, water quality and quantity are intimately linked. The quality of water affects its usefulness and, hence, effective availability; extreme high and low flows affect the quality of water; and both affect human and ecological health. The impacts of climate change appear certain to exacerbate these problems, making it all the more critical that governance structures, water management procedures, and technical tools bridge this long-standing gap—for managers, water users, regulators, and conservation advocates.

Our panelists explored the challenges at the forefront of managing both water quality and quantity, how this management can be streamlined and improved, and how the needs of various stakeholders can be reconciled.

Panelists:
James M. McElfish, Jr.
, Senior Attorney, Director, Sustainable Use of Land Program, Environmental Law Institute, Moderator
Alaina Armel, Water Resources Engineer, AECOM
Geoff Gisler, Senior Attorney and Leader, Clean Water Program, Southern Environmental Law Center
Roger Gorke, Senior Policy Advisor, Office of Water, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)

Materials:
ELI members will have access to materials/a recording of this session (usually posted w/in 48 hours). If you are not an ELI member but would like to have access to archived sessions like this one, go HERE to see the many benefits of membership and how to join.

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October 16, 2019
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An ELI 50th Anniversary Seminar

Millions of tons of plastic enter the environment every year, killing wildlife, releasing toxins, clogging drains, and marring landscapes. Bans or restrictions on single-use plastics—most commonly bags and straws—have exploded in popularity recent years as a means of addressing these problems. Over 125 nations and 240 U.S. cities and counties have banned or taxed plastic bags, several cities have banned or otherwise restricted the use of plastic straws, and several private companies, including Starbucks, have also taken steps to reduce their straw usage in response to widespread consumer pressure.

Yet, these bans remain controversial. Some businesses have pushed back against what they consider excessive regulation. Those in opposition have noted that some populations, including those with disabilities, may require the use of a plastic straw, and that taxes on plastic bags may constitute a regressive tax. Even the environmental benefits are far from certain: when plastic shopping bags are banned, use of other bags that are potentially worse for the environment –including thicker plastic bags using more plastic, or paper bags, with a larger carbon footprint – increases. Others maintain that banning single-use plastics uses valuable political capital that could instead be spent advancing more urgent and system agendas like transitioning to a low-carbon economy.

Our panelists explored the benefits and challenges of an increasingly popular, and increasingly contentious, approach to the problem of plastic pollution.

Panelists:
Lillian Power
, Environmental Protection Specialist, District of Columbia Department of Energy & Environment (DOEE), Moderator
Catherine Plume, Principal, BlueGreen Plume, LLC and Managing Director, (r)evolve
Matt Seaholm, Executive Director, American Progressive Bag Alliance
Jean-Cyril Walker, Partner, Keller and Heckman LLP

Materials:
ELI members will have access to materials/a recording of this session (usually posted w/in 48 hours). If you are not an ELI member but would like to have access to archived sessions like this one, go HERE to see the many benefits of membership and how to join.

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October 18, 2019
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Co-sponsored by Women in Government Relations, D.C. Bar Environment, Energy and Natural Resources Community, and Environmental Law Institute


Have you ever wondered how animals get listed on the list of endangered or threatened species? Do you know what it means to be listed? Have you been hearing about various species in the news and don’t know what the Endangered Species Act is? Our panelists will present the nuts and bolts of the ESA, how it has changed since it was first enacted, the latest developments in the regulatory arena, and some practical applications to industry and conservationists alike.

Speakers:

  • Erik C. Baptist, Partner, Wiley Rein (Former Deputy Assistant Administrator for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and Member of White House Endangered Species Interagency Working Group), Moderator
  • Karma Brown, Counsel, Hunton Andrews Kurth
  • Peg Romanik, Associate Solicitor, Division of Parks and Wildlife Office of the Solicitor, U.S. Department of the Interior
  • Janelle Lemen, Regulatory Director of Environmental Policy, National Rural Electric Cooperative Association

Press
This is event is off the record and not for press purposes.

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October 22, 2019
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The 2019 Award Dinner will take place on Tuesday, October 22, 2019
at
The Omni Shoreham Hotel
2500 Calvert Street, NW
Washington, DC
Please contact Melodie DeMulling at 202-939-3808 or demulling@eli.org
if you would like to become a Star Sponsor of the 2019 Award Dinner!

 This notice is for scheduling purposes only. Please check back later for more information.

 

October 22, 2019
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The 2019 ELI-Miriam Hamilton Keare Policy Forum

Historic accidents such as Fukushima, Three Mile Island, and Chernobyl have led to nuclear energy’s reputation as a significant environmental worry, mainly due to fears of potential contamination from a nuclear incident or improper disposal of radioactive waste. However, today the European Union depends on nuclear power for more than 25% of its electricity, and in the United States, nuclear-generated electricity protects the atmosphere from more than 528 million metric tons of carbon dioxide emissions from fossil fuels.

As climate concerns increase, many countries and businesses are reassessing the role of nuclear power in a climate sensitive future.  Questions are emerging around scheduling retirement of nuclear plants, even as barriers remain, including compliance with state and federal law, mitigating public concerns surrounding risks, and steep financial burdens such as building and operational costs. Some favor financial incentives for new nuclear capacity or perpetuating existing plants, while other note the risks, including infrastructure integrity of reactors, storage and disposal capacity, and potential environmental and health contamination risks.

What does the future of nuclear energy look like in this evolving landscape? How do the environmental challenges of nuclear energy stack up against the possible advantages from the vantage point of climate change, whether those be decommissioning reactors, disposing of nuclear waste, storage issues or others? Should nuclear energy be seen as a bridge fuel while other renewables scale up to meet energy demands, or even  as a fixed piece in a U.S. lower carbon energy mix? Panelists will engage in these questions and tackle the complex history, the multifaceted regulations, and the future of nuclear energy development. Join ELI for the Annual ELI-Miriam Hamilton Keare Policy Forum, featuring leading experts exploring the divisive yet fascinating issues surrounding nuclear fleets in a carbon-sensitive age.

Opening Remarks: Scott Fulton, President, Environmental Law Institute

Panelists:
John C. Dernbach
, Director, Environmental Law and Sustainability Center and Commonwealth Professor of Environmental Law and Sustainability, Widener University Commonwealth Law School and Author and Editor, Legal Pathways to Deep Decarbonization in the United States
W. Mason Emnett, Vice President, Competitive Market Policy, Exelon Corporation
Sandra Levine, Senior Attorney, Conservation Law Foundation (CLF)
Granta Nakayama, S.B., S.M, Partner, King & Spalding LLP

Materials:
Any speaker materials will be posted as they are received...


NOTE: ELI members will have access to materials/a recording of this session (usually posted w/in 48 hours). If you are not an ELI member but would like to have access to archived sessions like this one, go HERE to see the many benefits of membership and how to join.

October 22, 2019
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ELI 2019 Corporate Forum

In the absence of a national government mandate to intensify use of renewable energy, many corporations are increasing their own reliance on renewable energy forces. Numerous utilities are likewise transitioning towards more renewable energy, including wind, thermal, and solar power in their energy mix. Despite these shifts, renewable energy continues to face challenges including those of battery storage, grid expansion and incorporation of renewables into the grid, energy transmission, initial project costs, and regulatory barriers.

How are utilities and energy-consuming companies’ intending on increasing their renewables portfolios while navigating this terrain? What role are renewable energy credits playing in the progression that many companies seek? What are the barriers to greater reliance on renewable energy and how might they be overcome? The 2019 Annual Corporate Forum will explore these questions and tackle the obstacles and opportunities for corporations and renewable energy.

Panelists:
Sofia O'Connor
, Staff Attorney, Environmental Law Institute, Moderator
Wayne Balta
, Vice President, Corporate Environmental Affairs & Product Safety, IBM Corporation
Janice Dean, Deputy Counsel, New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA)
Beth Deane, Chief Counsel, Project Development, First Solar

Materials:
If there are any materials for this session, they will be posted as they are received.

ELI members will have access to a recording and any materials from this session. If you are not an ELI member but would like to have routine access to archived sessions like this one, go HERE to see the many benefits of membership and how to join.

October 22, 2019
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Co-sponsored by Vanderbilt Energy and Environmental Law Program, Environmental Law Institute, Vanderbilt Environmental Law and Policy Annual Review, and Vanderbilt Energy and Environmental Law Society


The Implications of the Universal Owner for Climate Mitigation

This workshop will explore the implications of the universal owner concept for climate mitigation. An emerging literature suggests that because many large institutional investors have diversified portfolios that mirror the market, they do not benefit from any one company profiting through negative externalities that harm other companies. If this concept survives critical scrutiny, it may explain why institutional investors are increasingly pushing for decarbonization across many sectors and may predict that this pressure will continue in the future. Climate change is a systemic investment risk that cannot be diversified away, so the universal owner concept also may become the focus of shareholder activism from institutional investors that have typically been passive overseers of corporate behavior. Drawing on insights from experts in environmental and securities law, economics, and other fields, this workshop will explore the viability of the universal owner concept and the implications for climate mitigation and other environmental, social and governance issues.  The workshop will be accessible to the public as a webinar via the information provided above.

Moderator: Mike Vandenbergh (Vanderbilt)

Panelists:
Madison Condon
(NYU Law School)
Rick Alexander (Shareholder Commons)
Margaret Blair (Vanderbilt Law School)
Yesha Yadav (Vanderbilt Law School)
Mark Cohen (Owen Graduate School of Management)

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October 25, 2019
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Co-sponsored by the Environmental Law Institute; D.C. Bar Environment, Energy, and Natural Resources Community; DC Environment and Energy Associations; Energy and Environmental Law Forum of the Women’s Bar Association of the District of Columbia; The Sabin Center for Climate Change Law, Columbia University Law School; Women in Government Relations; and the Climate Change and Sustainable Development and Ecosystems Committee of ABA SEER


This event is a proud part of DC Pro Bono Week!

Legal Pathways to Deep Decarbonization in the United States provides a “legal playbook” for deep decarbonization in the United States, identifying well over 1,000 legal options for enabling the United States to address one of the greatest problems facing this country and the rest of humanity. The publication focuses on energy efficiency, conservation, and fuel switching; electricity decarbonization; fuel decarbonization; carbon capture and negative emissions; non-carbon dioxide climate pollutants; and a variety of other cross-cutting issues. The legal options involve federal, state, and local law, as well as private governance. While both the scale and complexity of deep decarbonization are enormous, the underlying message is simple: deep decarbonization is achievable in the United States using laws that exist or could be enacted. These legal tools can be used with significant economic, social, environmental, and national security benefits. Building off May’s Legal Pathways to Deep Decarbonization in the US: Pro Bono Implementation Project, participants are invited to tune into a webinar describing key efforts by lawyers to address climate change: The Legal Pathways to Deep Decarbonization Pro Bono Project, the American Bar Association's (ABA's) Resolution 111, and other climate change efforts.

On The Legal Pathways to Deep Decarbonization Pro Bono Project, as part of DC Pro Bono Week 2019, experienced panelists will outline this unique pro bono project in which lawyers can draft model legislation to implement the recommendations set  forth in  Legal Pathways. The legal options identified involve federal, state, and local law, as well as private governance.

With regard to the ABA's Resolution 111 on Climate Change, panelists will discuss the contents of this Resolution, which was approved by the ABA House of Delegates this past August, as well as other ABA efforts to address climate change. The ABA Resolution urges all levels of government (federal, state, local, tribal and territorial) and the private sector to use a broad range of legal mechanisms to address climate change. The Resolution also encourages lawyers with a broad range of expertise in various areas of the law to get involved in pro bono efforts to assist in addressing climate change.

Please join co-sponsoring organizations and leading panelists for an exploration of opportunities for pro bono work mitigating climate change through these cutting-edge initiatives.

Panelists:
Caitlin McCarthy
, Director, Education, Associates and Corporate Partnerships, Environmental Law Institute (Moderator)
John C. Dernbach
, Director, Environmental Law and Sustainability Center and Commonwealth Professor of Environmental Law and Sustainability, Widener University Commonwealth Law School and Author and Editor, Legal Pathways to Deep Decarbonization in the United States
Amy L. Edwards, Partner, Holland & Knight LLP and Immediate Past Chair, American Bar Association’s Section of Environment, Energy and Resources (SEER)
Michael B. Gerrard, Andrew Sabin Professor of Professional Practice, Columbia Law School and Author and Editor, Legal Pathways to Deep Decarbonization in the United States
Richard Horsch, Retired Partner, White & Case LLP

Materials:
ELI members will have access to any materials/a recording of this session (usually posted w/in 48 hours). If you are not an ELI member but would like to have access to archived sessions like this one, go HERE to see the many benefits of membership and how to join.

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October 29, 2019
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An ELI and Jenner & Block LLP Co-Sponsored 50th Anniversary Seminar

The Great Lakes Basin is the largest freshwater system in the world, containing 20% of the earth’s fresh water.  Careful management has proven vital to the health of this key natural resource, and has become increasingly important in light of recent challenges and in preparation for the expected impacts of climate change upon the Lakes and the communities that rely on them.

Panel 1: The Great Lakes Compact and Water Rights

More than 35 million people in the U.S. and Canada use the Great Lakes for drinking water, jobs, and recreation. Upwards of 40 million gallons of water are drawn from the Great Lakes every day for use in electrical power production, drinking water, industrial production, and agriculture. Recent debates over who is eligible to use Great Lakes water have sparked renewed tension amongst those who rely on these water resources. Expert panelists are leaders in Great Lakes policy, and will explore various innovations in water management as well as potential tactics and initiatives to ensure the sustainable use of Great Lakes water.

Panelists:
Steven Siros
, Partner, Chair, Environmental Litigation Practice, and Co-Chair, Environmental Workplace Health and Safety Practice, Jenner & Block, Moderator
Cameron Davis, Commissioner, Metropolitan Water Reclamation District of Greater Chicago and former Great Lakes Czar
Victoria Pebbles, Program Director, Great Lakes Commission

Panel 2: Algae Blooms

There has been a significant uptick in the incidence of algae blooms in waters throughout the United States. The Great Lakes have not been immune, with widespread algae blooms being reported in all of the Great Lakes. Recent examples include a 2014 algae bloom in Lake Erie that forced the city of Toledo to declare the water unsafe for drinking or bathing and a 2018 significant algae bloom reported around the Apostle Islands in Lake Superior. As climate change continues to contribute to warming waters, there is a high likelihood of increased algae blooms throughout the Great Lakes. Leading experts representing a range of environmental sectors are engaged in and will dive into their ongoing efforts to address the conditions that contribute to algae blooms in the Great Lakes. This panel will focus on the causes and potential risks associated with algae blooms in the Great Lakes.

Panelists:
Gabrielle Sigel
, Partner and Co-Chair, Environmental and Workplace Health and Safety Law Practice, and Climate and Clean Technology Law Practice, Jenner & Block,
Moderator
Todd Brennan, Senior Policy Manager, Alliance for the Great Lakes
Robert Michaels, Senior Attorney, Environmental Law and Policy Center
William Goodfellow, Jr., Principal Scientist, Health Sciences, Exponent
Todd Nettesheim, Deputy Director, Great Lakes National Program Office (GLNPO), Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)

Materials:
Materials will be posted as they are received...

ELI members will have access to materials/a recording of this session (usually posted w/in 48 hours). If you are not an ELI member but would like to have access to archived sessions like this one, go HERE to see the many benefits of membership and how to join

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October 30, 2019
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An ELI 50th Anniversary Master Class

Increasingly destructive hurricanes, worsening droughts and wildfires, and rising seas are prompting the development of legal, policy, and institutional solutions to address the impacts of climate change and create more resilient communities. Join ELI and leading experts for this Master Class on Climate Adaptation: Principles, Policy, and Practice. Panelists will explore current climate adaptation practices and provide insight on regulatory and policy approaches at the federal, state, and local levels.

1:00-2:30 PM

Panel 1: Climate Adaptation -- Principles and Policy will dive into the role of government regulations in climate adaptation, and how adaptation practices have evolved over time, especially from a planning and policy perspective. Panelists will review opportunities for innovative adaptation measures, examine implementation obstacles, and discuss cross-cutting considerations, including equity and justice for vulnerable communities.

Panelists:

2:30 - 2:45

Networking Break

2:45 - 4:15

Panel 2:  Adaptation in Practice will focus on ways multiple stakeholders can identify and implement the next steps in moving from an adaptation plan to adaptation action. Expert panelists will explore the Federal Emergency Management Agency’s (FEMA) natural hazard mitigation approaches, best methods for integrating climate risk assessments into existing adaptation operations, and climate adaptation examples on multiple jurisdictional scales.

Panelists:

  • Margaret E. Peloso, Partner, Vinson & Elkins LLP, Moderator

  • Mark Ellard, Senior Principal Water Resources and Environmental Engineer, Geosyntec Consultants
  • Kate Johnson, Chief, Green Building & Climate Branch, D.C. Department of Energy and Environment (DOEE)
   

Materials:
Materials will be posted as they are received...

 


CLE INFORMATION:

In-person CLE Attendees:

  • We will have a sign-in and sign-out sheet for you to initial and fill out with time total time of attendance for the Master Class.
  • We will provide you with your CLE information at the end of the Master Class.

Webinar CLE Attendees (you must have selected CLE info when you registered):

  • When watching the webinar you will need to have the webinar at the forefront of your computer screen as GoTo webinar software will be tracking attentiveness and creating an attentiveness report.
  • You will need to be watching the webinar for a majority of the time to receive CLE Credit.
  • We will email you the CLE information and certification within one week of the event.

 

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