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June 2019

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June 4, 2019
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Each summer, ELI convenes a complimentary seminar series that offers an introduction to the legal and policy foundations of environmental protection in the United States.

ELI's Summer School is a series of brown-bag lunch seminars taught by experts in their fields, introducing the audience to the major environmental statutes (including the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), Clean Air Act (CAA), Clean Water Act (CWA), Endangered Species Act (ESA), Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA), Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), and Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA)), land use law, and environmental justice. Faculty will also incorporate major regulatory and judicial updates to the laws.

Who will benefit: All are welcome. Students and emerging professionals will have unique opportunities to learn, hear updates, ask questions, and network. The series is intended for:

  • undergraduates,
  • law students and graduate students, and
  • working professionals new to or looking for a refresher course in environmental law (such as interns, summer clerks, and associates, or second-career professionals).

An Introduction to Careers in Environmental Law and Policy

Our Summer School Series began with a session to introduce participants to the many exciting career options in various sectors of environmental law and policy. This session offered the opportunity for budding environmental professionals to ask questions and interact with leading experts in the environmental law and policy fields. Faculty discussed their career journeys and represent a diverse range of backgrounds including:

  • private practice,
  • policy,
  • corporate,
  • government,
  • and non-profit.

Faculty:
Caitlin F. McCarthy
, Director, Associates Program, Environmental Law Institute, Moderator
Kendra Brown, Chief of Staff, Congressman G. K. Butterfield, U.S. House of Representatives
Toby Chun, Partner, Environmental Transactional Practice Group, Kirkland & Ellis LLP
Rachel Ramos, Attorney-Advisor, Office of General Counsel, National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)
Kathleen Robertson, Sr. Manager, Environmental Policy & Wholesale Market Development, Exelon
Shannon Scruggs Campagna, Vice President, Van Scoyoc Associates

**See the entire Summer School 2019 schedule HERE.**

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June 5, 2019
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An ELI WELL (Women in Environmental Law & Leadership) and Beveridge & Diamond Co-Sponsored 50th Anniversary Seminar

This year marks the official 50th Anniversary of the Environmental Law Institute and ELI is reflecting back on our important work in shaping environmental law and governance in the United States and imagining an even more impactful future. The month of June focuses on Gender and the Environment, including this signature program focused on women in environmental law crafting an even more impactful future.

Women have been integral to environmental protection and to the development of environmental law. Yet, women environmental leaders continue to face inequities and obstacles, including obstacles unique to energy and environmental law. ELI, Beveridge & Diamond, and women leaders in environmental law came together for an interactive discussion about the barriers facing women in this field and how to overcome them. The panelists—including environmental lawyers from private practice, government, corporations, and nongovernmental organizations—shared efforts by their organizations to promote women and explore ideas that attendees could take away and apply in their work to help increase the visibility, leadership, and impact of women in the field.

Panelists:
Erika Holsman, Associate, Beveridge & Diamond, Moderator
Lisa A. Castañon, Deputy Regional Counsel, Environmental Protection Agency Region 10
Robin Repass, Senior Corporate Counsel, Amazon Operations Environmental, Health & Safety, Amazon
Amy van Saun, Senior Attorney, Center for Food Safety
Tracy Y. Williams, Associate, Beveridge & Diamond

Materials:

ELI members will have access to a recording of this session (usually posted w/in 48 hours). If you are not an ELI member but would like to have access to archived sessions like this one, go HERE to see the many benefits of membership and how to join.

 

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June 7, 2019
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Co-Sponsored by the Environmental Law Institute, POET LLC, and Van Ness Feldman LLP


For the third year in a row and heading into the fourth, the transportation sector continues to be the largest source of greenhouse gas (GHG) emission in the United States. In response, states including California and Oregon have implemented low carbon fuels standards and alternative fuels standards to reduce GHG emissions from transportation. These sophisticated standards examine the intensity of GHG emissions per unit of fuel energy through the whole lifecycle of fuel including production, shipment, and use.

Washington State proposed their own state-level low carbon fuels standards which had aimed to reduce GHG emissions from transportation fuels to 10% below 2017 levels by 2028, and 20% below 2017 levels by 2035. However, in April 2019, the Washington state low carbon fuels bill stalled, prompting experts to return to the drawing board to tackle this pressing issue.

ELI, POET LLC, Van Ness Feldman LLP, and expert panelists presented this captivating program on the obstacles and opportunities of the legislative and regulatory processes for the use of cleaner fuels with lower carbon intensity. Panelists focused on low carbon fuel standards and alternative fuel standards, opportunities to use low carbon biofuels, the multifaceted challenges associated with the rule-making processes, and share multiple perspectives on the leading obstacles and areas of opportunity for reducing GHG emissions in the transportation sector.

Welcoming Address:
Sara Leverette
, Of Counsel, Van Ness Feldman LLP

Opening Keynote:
Representative Shelley Kloba, 1st District, Washington House of Representatives

Panelists:
Shailesh Sahay, Senior Regulatory Counsel, POET LLC, Moderator
Kyle Danish, Partner, Van Ness Feldman LLP and Senior Fellow, Energy and National Security Program, Center for Strategic and International Studies
Craig Kenworthy, Executive Director, Puget Sound Clean Air Agency
Oyango Snell, Senior Vice President, General Counsel, and Corporate Secretary, Western States Petroleum Association
Michael Walz, Director, Public Affairs and State Government Relations, POET LLC

Materials:
ELI members will have access to materials/a recording of this session (usually posted w/in 48 hours). If you are not an ELI member but would like to have access to archived sessions like this one, go HERE to see the many benefits of membership and how to join.

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June 10, 2019
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Staying on top of the legal and policy developments in the climate change arena is no small task. As a special service to our members, the Environmental Law Institute provides a series of monthly conference calls with national experts on climate law and policy to keep you up to date and to answer your questions.

SmokyPlanet

Topics addressed in this month's call:

  • Biden and Warren climate plans
  • Trump White House efforts to reopen climate science
  • Smattering of new bills in Congress
  • Mayor Bowser releases Resilient DC: A Strategy to Thrive in the Fact of Climate Change

  • Governor Newsom Directs State Agencies to Prepare Water Resilience Portfolio for California

  • Cuomo Administration announced its intention to provide $30 million towards improving the electric grid

  • In May, the State of Louisiana released seven climate adaptation plans (one regional and six for individual parishes) through the Louisiana Strategic Adaptations for Future Environments (LA SAFE) program.

  • In May, New Hampshire passed a bill to have the state establish a commission to study the ramifications of climate resilience for the design and location of septic systems

  • Anchorage published its Climate Action Plan at the end of April

  • Nevada Gov. Sisolak signed a bill to increase renewables provided by electric companies within the state to 50% by 2030

  • Washington passes law requiring 100% clean energy by 2045

  • CO Governor Polis signs major climate legislation

  • Maryland legislature passes 50% RPS bill & Gov. Hogan allows bill to take effect

  • New Jersey Gov. Murphy announces State Interagency Electric Vehicle Partnership

  • Juliana v. United States, No. 18-36082 (9th Cir.)

  • Birckhead v. Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, No. 18-1218 (D.C. Cir.)

  • Otsego 2000 v. Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, No. 18-1188 (D.C. Cir.)

  • American Fuel & Petrochemical Manufacturers v. O’Keeffe, No. 18-881 (U.S.)

  • WildEarth Guardians v. Bernhardt, No. 1:16-cv-01724 (D.D.C.)

  • WildEarth Guardians v. Chao, No. 18-cv-110 (D. Mont.)

  • League of Conservation Voters v. Trump, No. 3:17-cv-00101 (D. Alaska), on appeal, Nos. 19-35460, 19-35461, & 19-35462 (9th Cir.)

  • Citizens for Clean Energy v. U.S. Department of the Interior, No. 4:17-cv-00030 (D. Mont.)

  • von Colditz v. Exxon Mobil Corp., No. 3:19-cv-01067 (N.D. Tex.); Montini v. Woods, No. 3:19-cv-01068 (N.D. Tex.)

  • People v. Exxon Mobil Corp., No. 452044/2018 (N.Y. Sup. Ct.)

Speakers:
L. Margaret Barry, Arnold & Porter
James Bradbury, Mitigation Program Director, Climate Center, Georgetown University
Robert Sussman, Principal, Sussman & Associates

Materials:
ELI members logged on to the Members site will have access to a recording of this session (usually posted w/in 48 hours). If you are not an ELI member but would like to have access to archived sessions like this one, go HERE to see the many benefits of membership and how to join.


ELI Monthly Climate Briefings are made possible by the
generous support of our institutional members.


NOTE: This call/recording is for ELI members only. No comments may be quoted
or used without the express written permission of ELI and the panelist.

June 10, 2019
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An ELI and Stoel Rives LLP Co-Sponsored Master Class

Studies show that climate-induced warming is affecting water supplies and ecosystems in the western United States at a disproportionate rate. These impacts, coupled with a perceived lack of comprehensive action on the federal level, have prompted western states to mobilize mitigation and adaptation efforts. Greenhouse gas (GHG) emission reduction requirements and adaptation strategies emerging in the West provide valuable lessons that can inform climate policy nationwide.

This signature Master Class provided an in-depth exploration of GHG reduction and adaptation strategies in the West, and components that might be considered across the country. This program focused broadly and also specifically on forestry policy responses. Wildfires, and their massive destruction, have highlighted the impacts of climate change, but effective management of forests through policy responses presents major opportunities for climate mitigation and adaptation.

 

  Agenda

Opening Address: Laura Kerr, Associate, Stoel Rives LLP

Panel 1:  Market-Based Strategies for Greenhouse Gas Reduction

States on the western seaboard are increasingly focused on developing policies to address climate change concerns. This panel will provide an overview of, and perspectives on, responses to climate change emerging on the western seaboard at the state level, and broader lessons for the potential shaping of U.S. climate policy. Leading experts will explore a variety of market-based strategies for GHG reduction, the legal and regulatory components impacting and impacted by these strategies, and provide case studies highlighting both areas of success and challenges. Panelists representing a spectrum of backgrounds will provide key insight into the most pressing components of implementing GHG reductions in a successful, economical, and equitable way, all through the lens of the present regulatory structure.

  • Rachel Hoffman Cox, Partner, Stoel Rives LLP, Moderator
  • Greg Dotson, Assistant Professor of Law, Environmental and Natural Resources Law Center, University of Oregon
  • Tiffany Roberts, Director, Regulatory & Legislative Policy, Western States Petroleum Association (WSPA)
  • Thomas R. Wood, Partner, Stoel Rives LLP

Panel 2:  Managing Forests for Climate Change Adaptation

Forests are well-known to be a critical tool for climate change adaptation. To effectively use this tool, however, careful forest management is key. Recent catastrophic wildfires, some of the worst in modern history, have highlighted how challenging this can be. In this panel, leading experts will focus on how adaptation strategies are changing how forests are managed, especially in the west. Representing a broad spectrum of backgrounds, these leading experts will focus on multiple stakeholder engagement, potential regulatory and policy changes facing forest management in light of recent wildfires, best practices for businesses operating in this space, private environmental governance, case studies of the challenges and opportunities in this sector, and more.

  • Greg D. Corbin, Partner, Stoel Rives LLP, Moderator
  • Michelle Passero, Director, California Climate Program, The Nature Conservancy

  • Andrew Elsbree, Vice President and General Manager, Oregon Operations, Green Diamond Resource Company
  • Lawson  Fite,  General  Counsel,  American  Forest  Resource  Council

Materials:
ELI members will have access to materials/a recording of this session (usually posted w/in 48 hours). If you are not an ELI member but would like to have access to archived sessions like this one, go HERE to see the many benefits of membership and how to join.


CLE INFORMATION:

In-person CLE Attendees:

  • Instructions will be given at the course site.

Webinar CLE Attendees:

  • Please listen for and record the CLE codes that will be read out loud during the program. If you do not include the code, you will not be awarded CLE Credit.
  • CLE codes from the webinar should be sent to events@stoel.com within one business week of the program date (June 17).

  • Any CLE questions or concerns, please do not hesitate to reach out to events@stoel.com.

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June 11, 2019
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Each summer, ELI convenes a complimentary seminar series that offers an introduction to the legal and policy foundations of environmental protection in the United States.

ELI's Summer School is a series of brown-bag lunch seminars taught by experts in their fields, introducing the audience to the major environmental statutes (including the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), Clean Air Act (CAA), Clean Water Act (CWA), Endangered Species Act (ESA), Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA), Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), and Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA)), land use law, and environmental justice. Faculty will also incorporate major regulatory and judicial updates to the laws.

Who will benefit: All are welcome. Students and emerging professionals will have unique opportunities to learn, hear updates, ask questions, and network. The series is intended for:

  • undergraduates,
  • law students and graduate students, and
  • working professionals new to or looking for a refresher course in environmental law (such as interns, summer clerks, and associates, or second-career professionals).

NEPA, ESA and Fundamentals of Environmental Law

The oldest major environmental statutes that we know today have existed for more than 40 years. This session served as an introduction to the framework of environmental law and also highlights two major statutes.

The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) was enacted to establish a national policy and means for carrying out protective environmental principles. NEPA also established the White House Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) to ensure federal agencies meet their obligations under NEPA. Recent proposals to amend and update NEPA have focused on the environmental review process in order to reduce the long wait times from five years to two.

The Endangered Species Act (ESA) is the principal law for the protection of endangered species. Administered by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) and the Commerce Department's National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), ESA protects and recovers imperiled species deemed either “endangered” or “threatened” and the ecosystems which they depend on. Recent proposals have been presented to amend regulations regarding the factors for listing species as “threatened” under ESA.

This session served both as an introduction to the fundamentals of environmental law and highlight these two major statutes:

  • the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), known as the "Magna Carta" of environmental law, and
  • the Endangered Species Act (ESA), known as the “pit bull” of environmental law.

Faculty:
Jake Li, Director of Biodiversity, Environmental Policy Innovation Center
Ann D. Navaro, Partner, Bracewell LLP

Materials:
Jake Li presentation
Ann Navaro presentation

**See the entire Summer School 2019 schedule HERE.**

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June 12, 2019
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An ELI and Nossaman LLP Co-Sponsored Seminar

The 2018 wildfire season was the deadliest and most destructive recent wildfire season on record in California, destroying thousands of structures. California Governor Gavin Newsom has created a new strike force, charged with developing a comprehensive strategy to address the destabilizing effect of catastrophic wildfires. In April of this year, Governor Newsom announced the results of this effort in the highly-anticipated report, “Wildfires and Climate Change: California’s Energy Future” (“Strike Force Report”).

The Strike Force Report set out steps California must take to reduce wildfire incidence and severity, including significant wildfire mitigation and resiliency efforts.  Recognizing that climate change is a core driver of heightened wildfire risk, the report outlines a vision for clean energy policies to reduce the impacts of climate change on wildfire risk.  On the legal front, the report suggests that utility shareholders should continue to be responsible where a utility fails to operate safely, but that otherwise, a plan must allocate costs resulting from wildfires in a manner that shares the burden broadly among stakeholders.

Participants joined us for this crucial program leading up to the July 1 publication of the Commission on Catastrophic Wildfire Cost and Recovery’s set of recommendations to Governor Newsom and the California Legislature, built upon the Strike Force Report. Panelists explored wildfire liability, the proposed regulatory components set forth by the Strike Force Report, the challenges and benefits of each policy concept, the viability of various wildfire mitigation strategies, cost recovery options, inverse condemnation, and potential for incorporating climate impact research into wildfire policymaking.

Panelists:
Willis Hon
, Associate, Nossaman LLP, Moderator
Lloyd Dixon, Director, RAND Center for Catastrophic Risk Management and Compensation and Senior Economist, RAND Corporation
Kathleen Harrison, Principal Geologist, Geosyntec Consultants
David Pedersen, General Manager, Las Virgenes Municipal Water District

Materials:
ELI members will have access to a recording of this session (usually posted w/in 48 hours). If you are not an ELI member but would like to have access to archived sessions like this one, go HERE to see the many benefits of membership and how to join.

Reference Materials:

New Tools and Sweeping Changes Proposed in Draft Wildfire Commission Report (Nossaman Alert, May 30, 2019)
New De-Energization Guidelines Implemented Just in Time for the 2019 Wildfire Season (Nossaman Alert, June 11, 2019)

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June 13, 2019
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Co-Sponsored by the International Network for Environmental Compliance and Enforcement, Environmental Law Institute, and National Whistleblower Center


An INECE Discussion Series Event

Around the world, significant progress has been made to establish legal frameworks for environmental protection. Many of these laws can help to put a stop to pollution or conserve natural resources in the United States, as well as foreign countries and international waters. However, the success of these laws is greatly hindered by a lack of enforcement. Oftentimes, everyday citizens have evidence of environmental wrongdoing, or could easily collect it, but lack the know how to report such evidence to the authorities, or otherwise follow up on required procedures. Although various initiatives have been launched to engage citizens in environmental monitoring, few of these initiatives connect citizens with the law enforcement process. How can environmental monitoring initiatives fully harness the power of concerned citizens in the U.S. and around the world? Which laws consider and foster the engagement of citizens in the enforcement of environmental law, and how can these laws be better implemented to educate and motivate citizens while protecting them from retaliation?

This co-sponsored seminar focused on a critical component of environmental law enforcement: educating and empowering citizens in the U.S. and abroad. This seminar was the final of the 2019 Discussion Series that has been examining how whistleblower laws, emerging technologies, and citizen engagement are transforming the landscape of environmental enforcement today.

Panelists:
LeRoy C. Paddock
, Associate Dean for Environmental Studies, George Washington University Law School, Moderator
Shannon Dosemagen, Co-Founder, President & Executive Director, Public Laboratory for Open Technology and Science (Public Lab)
Shaun Goho, Deputy Director of Emmett Environmental Law & Policy Clinic, Harvard Law School
John Kostyack, Executive Director, National Whistleblower Center

Materials:
Shannon Dosemagen presentation
Shaun Goho presentation
John Kostyack presentation

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June 18, 2019
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Each summer, ELI convenes a complimentary seminar series that offers an introduction to the legal and policy foundations of environmental protection in the United States.

ELI's Summer School is a series of brown-bag lunch seminars taught by experts in their fields, introducing the audience to the major environmental statutes (including the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), Clean Air Act (CAA), Clean Water Act (CWA), Endangered Species Act (ESA), Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA), Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), and Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA)), land use law, and environmental justice. Faculty will also incorporate major regulatory and judicial updates to the laws.

Who will benefit: All are welcome. Students and emerging professionals will have unique opportunities to learn, hear updates, ask questions, and network. The series is intended for:

  • undergraduates,
  • law students and graduate students, and
  • working professionals new to or looking for a refresher course in environmental law (such as interns, summer clerks, and associates, or second-career professionals).

Basics of the Clean Water Act

Amended in 1972, the Clean Water Act (CWA) calls for ending the discharge of pollutants into the waters of the United States. Decades since the passage of the CWA, fundamental questions regarding the jurisdictional range remain unanswered. This session will explore the progress made to date and the potential changes on the horizon. In 2015, EPA enacted the Waters of the United States (WOTUS) rule to clarify which waterways and wetlands were subject to federal jurisdiction. However, some stakeholders believe the established program to be too broad. Recent proposals have been made to update WOTUS to better establish the difference between federally protected waterways under the CWA and state protected waterways. Faculty will explore one of the nation’s most significant and pivotal environmental laws as it develops, including:

  • the regulatory and permitting framework for limiting water pollution,
  • the key distinction between point sources and nonpoint sources of pollution,
  • the corporate and private practice roles in complying with CWA, 
  • the current legal context of WOTUS,
  • and the considerations policymakers face in light of growing demands for water usage with growing energy needs, extreme weather, and climate change.

Faculty:
Joanna Citron Day
, Environmental Enforcement Section, Department of Justice
Kathy Robb, Principal, Sive, Paget & Riesel P.C.
Amanda Waters, General Counsel, National Association of Clean Water Agencies (NACWA)

Materials:
Joanna Citron Day presentation
Kathy Robb presentation

Additional Materials:
Kathy Robb article, Take me to the river: Does the Clean Water Act regulation indirect discharges to groundwater? (Westlaw, 11/20/18)
Additional materials/presentations will be posted as they are received...

**See the entire Summer School 2019 schedule HERE.**

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June 20, 2019
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An ELI WELL (Women in Environmental Law  & Leadership) 50th Anniversary Seminar

While women have been critical to the development of environmental law and policy in the United States, those central contributions have been underreported and not well understood.  Women changed the course of American history through their leadership in the abolitionist, prohibition, suffragette, public health, and civil rights movements.  The techniques honed during those efforts influenced women shaping environmental law and policy. The challenges women faced in taking the lead in environmental law and policy in some ways are unique to the field—and even to each individual-- and in other ways mirror challenges faced by women in other disciplines.

As ELI celebrates “Gender and the Environment” month in June as part of its 50th Anniversary, join us for a panel discussion of how women have shaped environmental law and policy in the United States, the impact of that work on women’s roles in the environmental field, what the experience meant for those who contributed, and what the future holds for environmental law and policy with women increasingly in leadership roles.

The panel discussion will convene in Washington, DC, and will be available by webinar. Gatherings at receptions after the panel discussion will be held in Washington, DC, New York City, and other cities to be announced.  These events will provide participants the opportunity to continue the discussion in those venues.

Panelists:
Kathy Robb, Principal, Sive, Paget & Riesel P.C. and Adjunct Environmental Law Professor, Elisabeth Haub School of Law, Pace University (Moderator)
Dianne Dillon-Ridgley, Director, Interface, Inc.
Linda Fisher, former Vice President, Safety, Health and Environment and Chief Sustainability Officer, DuPont and former Deputy Administrator, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
Seema Kakade, Director, Environmental Law Clinic and Assistant Professor of Law, Francis King Carey School of Law, University of Maryland
Peggy Shepard, Co-Founder and Executive Director, WE ACT for Environmental Justice

Materials:

There will be no materials for this session.

 


Additional Webcast/Networking sites (please register using the information provided for the appropriate location):

NEW YORK:
Allen & Overy
(simulcast by webinar; 4-5:30 PM Eastern Time)
1221 6th Avenue (map/directions)
New York, NY
Reception to follow
RSVP here to attend in person

SAN FRANCISCO:
Paul Hastings (simulcast by webinar; 1-2:30 PM Pacific Time)
101 California Street, 48th Floor (map)
San Francisco, CA
Lunch will be provided by the host firm
RSVP here to attend in person

 

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June 24, 2019
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Conference Co-Sponsored by ELI, Bergeson & Campbell, P.C., and the George Washington University Milken Institute School of Public Health


This conference marks the third Toxic Substances Control Act Annual Conference, expanding upon TSCA Reform at 2 Years and TSCA Reform: One Year Later. Leading panelists will reflect on the accomplishments and challenges since the implementation of the 2016 Lautenberg Amendments and where the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) stands today. Panelists will dive into a host of topics, including the current impacts of TSCA on science policies, challenges faced by industry, and the impacts of TSCA on regulatory policies especially those concerning ensuring compliance and enforcement. Join ELI, Bergeson & Campbell, P.C., the George Washington University Milken Institute School of Public Health, leading experts, and distinguished keynote speakers in a day-long exploration of the issues and regulations surrounding TSCA.

Agenda (all times are EDT)

9:00 - 9:30 AM

Registration

9:30 - 9:45 AM
Welcome and Overview of Forum

Lynn R. Goldman, Michael and Lori Milken Dean and Professor, Environmental and Occupational Health, Milken Institute School of Public Health, George Washington University

9:45 - 10:15 AM
Morning Keynote Discussion

Representative John Shimkus, Illinois (invited)
Senator Edward J. Markey, Massachusetts (invited)
Senator James M. Inhofe, Oklahoma (invited)

 

10:15 - 11:45 AM

Panel 1: TSCA Implementation: Where Are We Now?
Panel 1 will focus on how TSCA has been applied over the past three years since the enactment of the 2016 Lautenberg Amendments and the impact of TSCA’s implementation on the regulatory, environmental, political, and corporate sectors. This includes the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) updated inventory identifying active and inactive chemical substances, the new chemicals’ review process, and the regulation of existing chemicals. Additionally, panelists will tackle how to ensure public safety and corporate responsibility including the treatment and classification of confidential business information (CBI) in accordance with TSCA.

11:45 AM - 1:00 PM

Lunch Break (lunch provided)

12:30 - 1:00 PM

Luncheon Keynote:  Alexandra Dunn, Assistant Administrator, Office of Chemical Safety and Pollution Prevention, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

1:00 - 2:30 PM

Panel 2: Science Policy Issues
Panel 2 will dive into the numerous impacts of TSCA on science policy. Expert panelists will explore chemical prioritization and risk evaluation, chemical data reporting and its use in assessments, testing of new and existing chemicals, animal welfare considerations, and more.

  • George M. Gray, Ph.D., Professor, Department of Environmental and Occupational Health and Director of the Center for Risk Science and Public Health, The George Washington University, Moderator
  • Tala Henry, Ph.D., Deputy Director, Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (invited)

  • Oscar Hernandez, Ph.D., Senior Regulatory Chemist, Bergeson & Campbell P.C.
  • Britt L. McAtee, Ph.D., Manager, Toxicology, PPG Industries

2:30 - 2:45 PM

Coffee Break

2:45 - 4:15 PM

Panel 3: Regulatory and Policy Issues

Panel 3 will explore the regulations and policies under TSCA. Leading panelists will examine reporting and labeling requirements, current and potential future compliance standards, enforcement laws and policies, and the role of TSCA in upholding environmental justice.

  • James V. Aidala, Senior Government Affairs Consultant, Bergeson & Campbell P.C., Moderator
  • Richard E. Engler,Ph.D., Director of Chemistry, Bergeson & Campbell P.C.
  • Eve Gartner, Staff Attorney, Healthy Communities Program, Earthjustice
  • Jeffery Morris, Director, Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics, Environmental Protection Agency

4:15 - 4:30 PM

Concluding Remarks
To be announced...

 

 

 

 

Materials:
Materials will be posted as they are received...


 

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June 25, 2019
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Each summer, ELI convenes a complimentary seminar series that offers an introduction to the legal and policy foundations of environmental protection in the United States.

ELI's Summer School is a series of brown-bag lunch seminars taught by experts in their fields, introducing the audience to the major environmental statutes (including the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), Clean Air Act (CAA), Clean Water Act (CWA), Endangered Species Act (ESA), Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA), Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), and Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA)), land use law, and environmental justice. Faculty will also incorporate major regulatory and judicial updates to the laws.

Who will benefit: All are welcome. Students and emerging professionals will have unique opportunities to learn, hear updates, ask questions, and network. The series is intended for:

  • undergraduates,
  • law students and graduate students, and
  • working professionals new to or looking for a refresher course in environmental law (such as interns, summer clerks, and associates, or second-career professionals).

Basics of Land Use Law

Land use and planning touches numerous aspects of daily life. Embodying a range of laws and regulations across federal, state, and local levels, land use law impacts development, conservation, and more. Expert faculty will explore the history of land use, urban planning, and recent trends in approaches to planning communities and development. This session focuses on the primary elements of land use law, including:

  • foundations of land use law,
  • legal frameworks,
  • city and regional planning,
  • and conservation.

Faculty:
Heather Dlhopolsky
, Partner, Linowes and Blocher LLP
Sarah Everhart, Adjunct Professor, Research Associate and Legal Specialist, Agriculture Law Education Initiative, University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law
Diana Norris, Litigation Manager, Piedmont Environmental Council

Materials:
Materials will be posted as they are received...

**See the entire Summer School 2019 schedule HERE.**

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