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September 2017

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September 11, 2017
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Staying on top of the legal and policy developments in the climate change arena is no small task. As a special service to our members, the Environmental Law Institute provides a series of monthly conference calls with national experts on climate law and policy to keep you up to date and to answer your questions.

SmokyPlanet

Topics addressed in this month's call:

  • Three lawsuits brought by California's counties and city against fossil fuel companies
  • New Conservation Law Foundation suit in Rhode Island
  • Developments in Juliana litigation in Oregon
  • Recent federal regulatory developments
  • Climate-specific measures relating to national security that have advanced in both the House and Senate
  • RGGI's and California's program extensions
  • Massachusetts' new GHG regs
  • California's Climate-Safe Infrastructure Working Group
  • Miami's bond for infrastructure improvements to adapt to sea-level rise
  • Trump's recision of the Federal Flood Risk Management Standard

Speakers:
Michael B. Gerrard, Professor, Columbia Law School; Director, Sabin Center for Climate Change Law
Manik Roy, Senior Fellow, DEPLOY/US [formerly, ClimateWorks Foundation]
Robert Sussman, Principal, Sussman & Associates
Kate Zyla, Deputy Director, Climate Center, Georgetown University

Materials:
If you are an ELI member and are logged onto the Members site, you will see links below to available materials/recordings from this session. If you are not an ELI member but would like to have access to archived sessions like this one, go HERE to see the many benefits of membership and how to join.


ELI Monthly Climate Briefings are made possible by the
generous support of our institutional members.


NOTE: This call/recording is for ELI members only. No comments may be quoted
or used without the express written permission of ELI and the panelist.

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September 19, 2017
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An ELI Public Seminar

Tribes and Native Villages are demonstrating reinvigorated environmental activism as they face increased pressures on natural resource use. Consequentially, some of the most significant new developments in environmental law are occurring in Indian country. Tribes and Native villages find themselves on the front line of disputes over natural resource management and pollution control in a nation undergoing political, economic, and social transition. Emerging issues include adaptation to climate change, asserting treaty rights over natural resources, and balancing pollution reduction against tribal economic interests. The impacts of these issues extend far beyond Indian country, and potentially globally.

ELI is pleased to present a two-part series to learn more about the current debates surrounding environmental protection in tribal and urban Indian communities. Part I focused on groundbreaking litigation, including the Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL) and repercussions for Indian sovereignty, Agua Caliente Band v. Coachella Valley Water District ruling and tribe’s water rights, and determining energy development and tribal jurisdiction in the context of fracking. For information on the second event in this series, please go HERE.

Panelists:
Cynthia Harris
, Staff Attorney, Environmental Law Institute (moderator)
Nicole Ducheneaux, Partner, Fredericks Peebles & Morgan LLP
John Echohawk, Executive Director, Native American Rights Fund
James Meggesto, Partner, Holland & Knight LLP

Materials:
If you are an ELI member and are logged onto the Members site, you will see links below to available materials/recordings from this session. If you are not an ELI member but would like to have access to archived sessions like this one, go HERE to see the many benefits of membership and how to join.

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September 26, 2017
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An ELI Member Seminar

While off to a slow start in the United States, ocean energy technologies (wave, tidal, and current hydrokinetic energy) are already at an advanced phase of development in other parts of the world. The European Union is the current leader in ocean energy technology development, hosting more than 50% of tidal energy and about 45% of wave energy developers globally. In September 2016, Scotland opened its first grid connected tidal energy park, and eight EU countries have included ocean energy in their National Renewable Energy Action Plans (NREAPs).

In the U.S. however, development of hydrokinetic projects has been less successful. Wave and tidal energy developers claim that federal subsidies and tax cuts are insufficient to promote research and development, and some of the most successful ocean energy companies have moved overseas.

Though the current cost of hydrokinetic energy is higher in the U.S .compared to other fuels, and harnessing tidal and wave power poses technical challenges, some backers assert that tides are a more predictable source of renewable energy. Should more resources and subsidies be put into hydrokinetic energy research? What environmental impacts do these technologies pose compared to other renewable energy sources? What regulatory barriers need to be addressed to support the development of the hydrokinetic technology sector in the U.S.?

Panelists:
Xiao Recio-Blanco, Director, Ocean Program, Environmental Law Institute (moderator)
Annie Jones, Attorney-Advisor, Energy Projects, Office of General Counsel, Federal Energy Regulatory Commission
Meghan Massaua, Mediator and Program Manager, Meridian Institute
Seán O’Neill, Founder and Principal, Symmetrix Public Relations & Communication Strategies

Materials:
Séan O'Neill presentation
Additional materials forthcoming...


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September 27, 2017
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An ELI Public Seminar

Tribes and Native Villages are demonstrating reinvigorated environmental activism as they face increased pressures on natural resource use. Consequentially, some of the most significant new developments in environmental law are occurring in Indian country. Tribes and Native Villages find themselves on the front line of disputes over natural resource management and pollution control in a nation undergoing political, economic, and social transition. Emerging issues include adaptation to climate change, asserting treaty rights over natural resources, and balancing pollution reduction against tribal economic interests. The impacts of these issues extend far beyond Indian country, and potentially globally.

Join ELI and our experts for this two-part series to learn more about the current debates surrounding environmental protection in tribal and urban Indian communities. Part II will focus on new challenges posed to tribes and Native Villages by a changing climate and strained natural resources, economic obstacles and opportunities for renewable development, climate-induced relocation, Environmental Justice and the Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL).

Panelists:
Cynthia Harris
, Staff Attorney, Environmental Law Institute (moderator)
James Grijalva, Law Professor & Director of Tribal Environmental Law Project, University of North Dakota School of Law (invited)
Pilar Thomas, Of Counsel, Lewis Roca Rothgerber Christie LLP
Michael Walleri, Of Counsel, Gazewood & Weiner, PC

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