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Weekly Update Volume 36, Issue 32

11/13/2006

LITIGATION

PROPERTY DAMAGE, REMEDIATION, COST ALLOCATION:

The Second Circuit vacated and remanded a lower court decision ordering an insurance company to indemnify a chemical manufacturer for liability incurred as a result of environmental contamination at four sites near Niagara Falls. The district court allocated the costs of remediation equally over the years in which a jury found that the property damage occurred, resulting in liability being attributed to the insurance company's excess insurance policies in each of those years. But the costs of remediation should have been allocated according to the amount of property damage that occurred in each policy period, rather than equally over the years. In addition, by not allowing the jury to consider as property damage the passive migration or spread of contaminants, the district court's instructions to the jury were erroneous. On remand, the lower court must either reconsider the insurance company's motion for judgment as a matter of law or conduct a new trial. If the latter, the insurance company should be permitted to raise the defense of late notice. Olin Corp. v. Certain Underwriters at Lloyd's London, No. 05-5123, 36 ELR 20227 (2d Cir. Nov. 7, 2006) (26 pp.).

FLPMA, NEPA, ANNUAL SPECIES REVIEW:

The Ninth Circuit reversed a lower court decision upholding BLM's annual species review decisions for the red tree vole and its approval of certain timber sales in the Pacific Northwest. BLM's annual species review decisions for the red tree vole violate FLPMA because the dramatic change in policy regarding the vole’s "survey and manage" designation cannot be reasonably defined as anything other than a change in a "term or condition" in the associated resource management plans. Similarly, BLM's failure to conduct an environmental review of these decisions violates NEPA. And because the timber sales were premised on those unlawful decisions, they too violate federal law and must be enjoined. Klamath Siskiyou Wildlands Center v. Boody, No. 06-35214, 36 ELR 20224 (9th Cir. Nov. 6, 2006) (23 pp.).

NEPA, GEOTHERMAL ENERGY:

The Ninth Circuit held that BLM and the U.S. Forest Service violated NEPA in extending certain leases on land considered sacred to Native American tribes and in approving a geothermal plant to be built there by a California power company. The agencies failed to take a "hard look" at the environmental consequences of the lease extensions, and they never adequately considered the no-action alternative before approving the project. The agencies also violated the National Historic Preservation Act and their fiduciary obligations to the tribes in extending the leases. And because the rest of the project approval process was premised on the power company’s possession of a valid right to develop the land, the entire approval must be set aside. Pit River Tribe v. United States Forest Service, No. 04-15746, 36 ELR 20223 (9th Cir. Nov. 6, 2006) (33 pp.).

ESA, CRITICAL HABITAT:

A district court remanded portions of FWS' critical habitat designation of over 800,000 acres of land in California and Oregon for 15 vernal pool species. The rule excluded 23 tracts of land that would either suffer from detrimental economic impacts or for which the economic benefits of exclusion outweighed the benefits of inclusion. A home builder association and an environmental group challenged the rule. On the association's motions for summary judgment, the court ruled that the FWS' explanation for excluding two of the tracts was inadequate. The FWS merely highlighted the monetary benefit to excluding these tracts rather than providing additional explanation as to why they were among the most impacted. The FWS simply concluded that the high cost of inclusion justifies exclusion without making a relative comparison amongst all tracts. And on the environmental group's motions for summary judgment, the court ruled that the FWS failed to adequately consider the recovery benefits that accompany critical habitat designation. All other challenges to the rule, however, were rejected. On remand, the FWS has 120 days to submit a new rule consistent with the opinion. Home Builders Ass'n of Northern California v. United States Fish and Wildlife Service, No. CIV. S-05-0629 WBS-GGH, 36 ELR 20226 (E.D. Cal. Nov. 2, 2006) (Shubb, J.) (27 pp.).

METHYL TERTIARY BUTLY ETHER, STRICT LIABILITY:

A California appellate court held that a water company may go forward with its strict liability claim against an oil company for methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) contamination stemming from gasoline leaks at nearby service stations. Although the oil company merely added the MTBE to the gasoline and did not operate the stations where the leaks occurred, strict liability broadly extends to products that have left the control of the manufacturer and are placed on the market, and a manufacturer must reasonably anticipate uses of the product while it is on the market. Foreseeable uses of gasoline reasonably include storing it at a gas station, transferring it through gas pumps into a vehicle, and storing it in a vehicle's tank before it is actually burned as fuel. Because California law provides broad protection to bystanders and does not limit strict liability to situations occurring after the sale of the product, permitting injured third parties to recover for damages associated with any of those foreseeable uses is consistent with the state's strict liability doctrine. Accordingly, a lower court erred in dismissing this claim. Nelson v. Superior Court of Sacramento County, No. C052420, 36 ELR 20225 (Cal. 3d App. Dist. Nov. 7, 2006) (15 pp.).

Copyright© 2006, Environmental Law Institute, Washington, D.C. All rights reserved.

THE FEDERAL AGENCIES

Note: Citations below are to the Federal Register (FR).

AIR:

  • EPA proposed NESHAPs for gasoline distribution bulk terminals, bulk plants, pipeline facilities, and gasoline dispensing facilities. 71 FR 66063 (11/9/06).
  • EPA proposed amendments to the emission standards for volatile organic compounds contained in the standards of performance for equipment leaks in the synthetic organic chemicals manufacturing industry and in petroleum refineries. 71 FR 65301 (11/7/06).
  • EPA proposed two primary regulatory alternatives for new and existing hospital sterilizers that emit hazardous air pollutants and are area sources within the meaning of CAA §112(a)(2). 71 FR 64907 (11/6/06).
  • SIP Approvals: California (emissions of particulate matter with a diameter of 10 microns or less (PM10) from open burning, general area sources, cotton gins, incinerators, and fuel burning equipment) 71 FR 65764 (11/9/06). Iowa (laundry activities and modeling guidelines) 71 FR 65414 (11/8/06). Missouri (compliance testing) 71 FR 64888 (11/6/06). North Carolina (eight-hour ozone NAAQS) 71 FR 64891 (11/6/06). Ohio (emission limits) 71 FR 65417 (11/8/06).
  • SIP Proposals: California (PM10 emissions from open burning, general area sources, cotton gins, incinerators, and fuel burning equipment; see above for direct final rule) 71 FR 65764 (11/9/06). Iowa (laundry activities and modeling guidelines; see above for direct final rule) 71 FR 65446 (11/8/06). Missouri (compliance testing; see above for direct final rule) 71 FR 64906 (11/6/06). North Carolina (eight-hour ozone NAAQS; see above for direct final rule) 71 FR 64906 (11/6/06).

HAZARDOUS & SOLID WASTE:

  • EPA proposed to grant final authorization of certain changes to Idaho's hazardous waste program under RCRA. 71 FR 65765 (11/9/06).
  • EPA entered into a settlement under CERCLA for reimbursement of past response costs concerning the Flura Corporation Leaking AST Superfund site in Newport, Tennessee. 71 FR 65813 (11/9/06).

WATER:

  • EPA promulgated a national primary drinking water regulation, the Ground Water Rule, to provide for increased protection against microbial pathogens in public water systems that use groundwater sources. 71 FR 65573 (11/8/06).
  • EPA announced its approval of changes to Michigan's NPDES program to include the administration and enforcement of a partial state sewage sludge management program. 71 FR 65509 (11/8/06).
  • EPA announced the availability of the final NPDES general permit for small municipal separate storm sewer systems in Puerto Rico. 71 FR 64952 (11/6/06).

WILDLIFE:

  • FWS designated critical habitat in Minnesota, Montana, and Washington for the contiguous United States distinct population segment of the Canada lynx. 71 FR 66007 (11/9/06).
  • FWS designated critical habitat in San Diego County, California, for the willowy monardella. 71 FR 65661 (11/8/06).
  • FWS announced its intent to prepare a comprehensive conservation plan and EA for the Pee Dee National Wildlife Refuge located in North Carolina. 71 FR 65122 (11/7/06).

DOJ NOTICES OF SETTLEMENT:

  • United States v. Detrex Corp., Inc., No. 1:06-cv- 2482 (N.D. Ohio Oct. 16, 2006). A settling CWA defendant must pay a total of $250,000 plus interest in civil penalties and injunctive relief for discharging pollutants into navigable waters in excess of its NPDES permit limitations and for failing to accurately monitor and correctly report its discharges to the U.S. and Ohio EPA, and must implement specified compliance measures concerning the discharges associated with its chemical manufacturing plant in Ashtabula, Ohio. 71 FR 65835 (11/9/06).
  • United States v. McKenna, No. 98-CV-5162 (E.D. Pa. Sept. 6, 2006). A settling CERCLA defendant who previously spent $150,000 performing cleanup at the North Penn 6 Superfund site in Lansdale, Pennsylvania, must pay an additional $40,000 in past response costs incurred at the site. 71 FR 65836 (11/9/06).
  • United States v. Milner, No. C01-0809RBL (W.D. Wash. Oct. 12, 2006). Settling CWA and Rivers & Harbors Act defendants must perform mitigation and must pay a civil penalty for discharging pollutants without a permit into waters of the United States and constructing a structure in navigable waters. 71 FR 65836 (11/9/06).
  • United States v. Tarrant, No. 03CV3899(JCL) (D.N.J. Oct. 17, 2006). A settling third-party CERCLA defendant must pay $1.00 in reimbursement of past response costs incurred at the Meadowlands Plating and Finishing Superfund site in East Rutherford, New Jersey. 71 FR 65837 (11/9/06).
  • United States v. E.I. Dupont De Nemours & Co., No. 06-612 (D. Del. Sept. 29, 2006). Settling CERCLA and Delaware Hazardous Substances Cleanup Act defendants must fund restoration projects on the "Pike Property'' in Delaware resulting from the release of hazardous substances from its chemical facility in Newport, Delaware, must reimburse each trustee for their damage assessment costs, and must pay the state for groundwater injuries; the total value of the settlement is $1.6 million. 71 FR 64984 (11/6/06).

Copyright© 2006, Environmental Law Institute, Washington, D.C. All rights reserved.

THE CONGRESS

PUBLIC LAWS:

  • S. 56 (Rio Grande Natural Area), which would establish the Rio Grande Natural Area in the state of Colorado, was signed into law by President Bush on Oct. 12, 2006. Pub. L. No. 109-337, 152 Cong. Rec. D1084 (daily ed. Nov. 9, 2006).
  • S. 176 (hydroelectricity), which would extend the deadline for commencement of construction of a hydroelectric project in the state of Alaska, was signed into law by President Bush on Oct. 5, 2006. Pub. L. No. 109-297, 152 Cong. Rec. D1082 (daily ed. Nov. 9, 2006).
  • S. 203 (national heritage area), which would reduce temporarily the royalty required to be paid for sodium produced and establish certain National Heritage Areas, was signed into law by President Bush on Oct. 12, 2006, Pub. L. No. 109-338, 152 Cong. Rec. D1084 (daily ed. Nov. 9, 2006).
  • S. 213 (land conveyance), which would direct the Secretary of the Interior to convey certain federal land to Rio Arriba County, New Mexico, was signed into law by President Bush on Oct. 11, 2006. Pub. L. No. 109-324, 152 Cong. Rec. D1083 (daily ed. Nov. 9, 2006).
  • S. 244 (hydroelectricity), which would extend the deadline for commencement of construction of a hydroelectric project in the state of Wyoming, was signed into law by President Bush on Oct. 5, 2006. Pub. L. No. 109-298, 152 Cong. Rec. D1082 (daily ed. Nov. 9, 2006).
  • S. 260 (fish and wildlife), which would authorize the Secretary of the Interior to provide technical and financial assistance to private landowners to restore, enhance, and manage private land to improve fish and wildlife habitats through the Partners for Fish and Wildlife Program, was signed into law by President Bush on Oct. 3, 2006. Pub. L. No. 109-294, 152 Cong. Rec. D1082 (daily ed. Nov. 9, 2006).
  • S. 1025 (land reclamation), which would amend the Act entitled "An Act to provide for the construction of the Cheney division, Wichita Federal reclamation project, Kansas, and for other purposes" to authorize the Equus Beds Division of the Wichita Project, was signed into law by President Bush on Oct. 5, 2006. Pub. L. No. 109-299, 152 Cong. Rec. D1082 (daily ed. Nov. 9, 2006).
  • S. 2430 (fish and wildlife), which would to amend the Great Lakes Fish and Wildlife Restoration Act of 1990 to provide for implementation of recommendations of the FWS contained in the Great Lakes Fishery Resources Restoration Study, was signed into law by President Bush on Oct. 11, 2006. Pub. L. No. 109-326, 152 Cong. Rec. D1083 (daily ed. Nov. 9, 2006).
  • H.R. 138 (coastal barrier resources), which would revise the boundaries of John H. Chafee Coastal Barrier Resources System Jekyll Island Unit GA-06P, was signed into law by President Bush on Oct. 16, 2006. Pub. L. No. 109-354, 152 Cong. Rec. D1085 (daily ed. Nov. 9, 2006).
  • H.R. 233 (wilderness), which would designate certain National Forest System lands in the Mendocino and Six Rivers National Forests and certain BLM lands in Humboldt, Lake, Mendocino, and Napa Counties in the state of California as wilderness, designate the Elkhorn Ridge Potential Wilderness Area, and designate certain segments of the Black Butte River in Mendocino County, California, as a wild or scenic river, was signed into law by President Bush on Oct. 17, 2006. Pub. L. No. 109-362, 152 Cong. Rec. D1085 (daily ed. Nov. 9, 2006).
  • H.R. 326 (national heritage area), which would amend the Yuma Crossing National Heritage Area Act of 2000 to adjust the boundary of the Yuma Crossing National Heritage Area, was signed into law by President Bush on Oct. 11, 2006. Pub. L. No. 109-318, 152 Cong. Rec. D1083 (daily ed. Nov. 9, 2006).
  • H.R. 479 (coastal barrier resources), which would replace a Coastal Barrier Resources System map relating to Coastal Barrier Resources System Grayton Beach Unit FL-95P in Walton County, Florida, was signed into law by President Bush on Oct. 16, 2006. Pub. L. No. 109-355, 152 Cong. Rec. D1085 (daily ed. Nov. 9, 2006).
  • H.R. 1442 (shipping), which would complete the codification of title 46, U.S. Code, "Shipping", as positive law, was signed into law by President Bush on Oct. 6, 2006. Pub. L. No. 109-304, 152 Cong. Rec. D1082 (daily ed. Nov. 9, 2006).
  • H.R. 1728 (national parks), which would authorize the Secretary of the Interior to study the suitability and feasibility of designating portions of Ste. Genevieve County in the state of Missouri as a unit of the National Park System, was signed into law by President Bush on Oct. 11, 2006. Pub. L. No. 109-319, 152 Cong. Rec. D1083 (daily ed. Nov. 9, 2006).
  • H.R. 2720 (land reclamation), which would further the purposes of the Reclamation Projects Authorization and Adjustment Act of 1992 by directing the Secretary of the Interior, acting through the Commissioner of Reclamation, to carry out an assessment and demonstration program to control salt cedar and Russian olive, was signed into law by President Bush on Oct. 11, 2006. Pub. L. No. 109-320, 152 Cong. Rec. D1083. (daily ed. Nov. 9, 2006).
  • H.R. 3443 (water), which would direct the Secretary of the Interior to convey certain water distribution facilities to the Northern Colorado Water Conservancy District, was signed into law by President Bush on Oct. 11, 2006. Pub. L. No. 109-320, 152 Cong. Rec. D1083 (daily ed. Nov. 9, 2006).
  • H.R. 4841 (wilderness), which would amend the Ojito Wilderness Act to make a technical correction, was signed into law by President Bush on Oct. 6, 2006. Pub. L. No. 109-309, 152 Cong. Rec. D1083 (daily ed. Nov. 9, 2006).
  • H.R. 4957 (fish), which would direct the Secretary of the Interior to convey the Tylersville division of the Lamar National Fish Hatchery and Fish Technology Center to the state of Pennsylvania, was signed into law by President Bush on Oct. 17, 2006. Pub. L. No. 109-363, 152 Cong. Rec. D1085 (daily ed. Nov. 9, 2006).
  • H.R. 5094 (land conveyance), which would require the conveyance of Mattamuskeet Lodge and surrounding property, including the Mattamuskeet National Wildlife Refuge headquarters, to the state of North Carolina to permit the state to use the property as a public facility dedicated to the conservation of the natural and cultural resources of North Carolina, was signed into law by President Bush on Oct. 16, 2006. Pub. L. No. 109-358, 152 Cong. Rec. D1085 (daily ed. Nov. 9, 2006).
  • H.R. 5160 (stewardship), which would establish the Long Island Sound Stewardship Initiative, was signed into law by President Bush on Oct. 16, 2006. Pub. L. No. 109-359, 152 Cong. Rec. D1085 (daily ed. Nov. 9, 2006).
  • H.R. 5539 (wetlands), which would reauthorize the North American Wetlands Conservation Act, was signed into law by President Bush on Oct. 11, 2006. Pub. L. No. 109-322, 152 Cong. Rec. D1083 (daily ed. Nov. 9, 2006).
  • H.R. 6061 (borders), which would establish operational control over the international land and maritime borders of the United States, was signed into law by President Bush on Oct. 26, 2006. Pub. L. No. 109-367 (daily ed. Nov. 9, 2006).

Copyright© 2006, Environmental Law Institute, Washington, D.C. All rights reserved.

IN THE STATES

Note: The entries below cover state developments since the last issue of Update. The entries are arranged by state, and within each section, entries are further subdivided by subject matter area. For a cumulative listing of materials reported in 2006, visit our list of Cumulative State Developments Arranged by State, or our list of Cumulative State Developments Arranged by Subject Matter. For state material reported prior to 2006, visit the ELR Archives.

The states below have updates this week:

Arkansas Louisiana New Jersey California Maine Texas Florida Massachusetts West Virginia Georgia Minnesota  

ARKANSAS

Air:

  • The Arkansas Pollution Control and Ecology Commission will hold a public hearing to receive comments on proposed revisions to Commission Regulation No. 19, its SIP for air pollution control. Proposed changes to Regulation No. 19 include the addition of a new Chapter 14 to meet Arkansas’ obligations under the recent federal Clean Air Interstate Rule to address interstate transport of nitrogen oxide and sulfur dioxide emissions from electric generating units that burn fossil fuels. The hearing will be held December 5, 2006. See http://www.adeq.state.ar.us/poa/pa/pn_reg_notice.asp

Water:

  • The Arkansas Pollution Control and Ecology Commission will hold a public hearing to receive comments on a third-party proposal by Lion Oil Company to change the Arkansas Water Quality Standards (PC&EC Regulation No. 2) for two streams affected by the company's wastewater discharge. The hearing will be held December 19, 2006. See http://www.adeq.state.ar.us/poa/pa/pn_reg_notice.asp

CALIFORNIA

Toxic Substances:

Water:

  • The Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment announced that a public meeting of the science advisory board's carcinogen identification committee will be held on November 16, 2006. See http://www.oal.ca.gov/notice/44z-2006.pdf (p.1659)

FLORIDA

Water:

  • The Southwest Florida Water Management District has proposed to amend Rule 40D-1.607, F.A.C., Permit Processing Fee, to revise the permit application processing fees for environmental resource permits to more accurately reflect statutory language and to create a fee waiver for certain petitions for formal wetland determinations. See http://faw.dos.state.fl.us/newfaw/FAWVOLUMEFOLDERS2006/3244/3244DOC.pdf (p.5156)
  • The Southwest Florida Water Management District has proposed amendments to Rule 40D-4.021, F.A.C., Individual Environmental Resource Permits. The proposed rule amendments would remove language in the definition of General Environmental Resource Permits to indicate that district staff is responsible for denying applications for such permits. See http://faw.dos.state.fl.us/newfaw/FAWVOLUMEFOLDERS2006/3244/3244DOC.pdf (p.5157)
  • The Southwest Florida Water Management District has proposed amendments to Rule 40D-4, F.A.C., Individual Environmental Resource Permits, to incorporate into the district’s rules a revised and updated operating agreement between the district and the Department of Environmental Protection regarding the division of responsibility for evaluating activities that require a permit under Part IV, Chapter 373, Florida Statutes. See http://faw.dos.state.fl.us/newfaw/FAWVOLUMEFOLDERS2006/3244/3244DOC.pdf (p. 5158)

GEORGIA

Water:

  • The Environmental Protection Division proposed to repeal the Rules for Water Well Pump Installers, Chapter 391-3-29. The proposed repeal will be considered by the Georgia Department of Natural Resources at its regular meeting on December 6, 2006. See http://www.gaepd.org/environet/29/notice.pdf
  • The Environmental Protection Division will hold two public hearings on the proposed amendment to Georgia’s Rules for Environmental Planning Criteria, Chapter 391316. The proposed rule would amend rule 391316. 01, Water Supply Watersheds, to clarify that local ordinances providing for the protection of required stream buffers may also contain provisions for a local buffer variance application and review process. The hearings will be held November 28 and 29, 2006. See http://www.gaepd.org/environet/16/notice.pdf

LOUISIANA

Hazardous and Solid Waste:

General:

MAINE

Hazardous and Solid Waste:

  • The Board of Environmental Protection has amended Chapter 870, which sets forth standards for labeling mercury-added products sold in Maine. The purpose of the amendment is to provide for the labeling of fluorescent and other mercury-added lamps so they can be readily identified for recycling. Maine law prohibits the disposal of these lamps in the trash. These rules became effective October 29, 2006. See http://www.maine.gov/sos/cec/rules/notices/2006/110106.htm

MASSACHUSETS

Hazardous and Solid Waste:

  • The Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection will hold six public hearings on proposed regulations that would revise the existing hazardous waste manifest regulations. The hearings will be held November 13, 14, 16, and 17, 2006. Comments are due December 1, 2006. See http://www.mass.gov/dep/public/manifest.htm

MINNESOTA

Water:

NEW JERSEY

Water:

  • The Department of Environmental Protection will hold a series of public hearings on a proposal to amend the Coastal Permit Program rules, N.J.A.C. 7:7, and Coastal Zone Management rules, N.J.A.C. 7:7E. The proposal seeks to protect and improve public access to tidal waterways and their shores through the repeal and replacement of the existing Public Access to the Waterfront rule with a new rule, Public Trust Rights rule, N.J.A.C. 7:7E-8.11. The hearings will be held November 28, 2006, and December 1 and 4, 2006. Comments are due January 5, 2007. See http://www.nj.gov/dep/rules/notices/110606b.htm.

Wildlife:

  • The Department of Environmental Protection is soliciting public comment on the proposal to readopt without changes the Conserve Wildlife Matching Grant Program rules, N.J.A.C. 7:5. Comments are due January 5, 2007. See http://www.nj.gov/dep/rules/notices/110606c.htm

TEXAS

Hazardous and Solid Waste:

Water:

WEST VIRGINIA

Air:

  • The West Virginia Department of Environmental Protection, Division of Air Quality, held a public hearing on the proposed eight-hour ozone air quality maintenance plan for Greenbrier County. The hearing was held November 9, 2006. See http://www.wvsos.com/adlaw/register/current/110306.pdf (p. 2044 )

 

Copyright© 2006, Environmental Law Institute, Washington, D.C. All rights reserved.

INTERNATIONAL

ZANZIBAR BANS PLASTIC SHOPPING BAGS

The government of Zanzibar, two East African islands off the coast of Tanzania, has imposed a ban on thin, transparent polyvinyl chloride plastic shopping bags. Zanzibar’s director of environmental protection said the ban was necessary because the bags were clogging sewers and producing poisonous fumes when burned; the small islands are not equipped with the technology to recycle plastic. Producers, importers, and/or sellers of shopping bags that violated the rule could face a fine of up to US $2,000 and a jail sentence of up to one year. See http://www.enn.com/today.html?id=11612

SOUTH AFRICA REDUCES TOTAL ALLOWABLE CATCH OF ABALONE

As the population of Perlemoen (abalone) has come under extreme pressure, mainly from illegal harvesting and the migration of rock lobster, the government of South Africa has reduced the total amount that may be harvested. Because the shellfish provides a huge financial profit for fishermen, it is being widely poached in large numbers and sold on the black market. "To this end, we are working on a comprehensive plan that will prevent the illegal harvesting (poaching) of abalone in the first instance. This will go a long way towards preventing our stocks from being entirely wiped out," said the Environmental Affairs and Tourism Minister. See http://allafrica.com/stories/200611020519.html

FIVE SOUTHEAST ASIAN COUNTRIES CONSENT TO NEW HAZE PLAN

Environment ministers from five Southeast Asian countries have approved a plan of action to fight forest fires in Indonesia that have been spreading smoke across the region. Ministers from Brunei, Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore, and Thailand have agreed "to set up an early warning system, build dams to block streams and rivers to divert water to underground peatlands and set up community-based firefighting brigades on Indonesia's Sumatra and Borneo islands, where most fires have raged." The plan would be officially adopted on Friday, November 10, when environment ministers from the 10-member Association of South East Asian Nations begin a two-day conference to expand cooperation in protecting and conserving the environment. See http://www.alertnet.org/thenews/newsdesk/B270909.htm

 

Copyright© 2006, Environmental Law Institute, Washington, D.C. All rights reserved.

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