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Weekly Update Volume 36, Issue 31

11/06/2006

LITIGATION

CWA, JURISDICTION, WETLANDS:

The First Circuit remanded the U.S. government’s CWA suit against a group of cranberry farmers in Carver, Massachusetts, in light of the U.S. Supreme Court's decision in Rapanos v. United States, 126 S. Ct. 2208, 36 ELR 20116 (2006). Prior to Rapanos, the court had upheld jurisdiction over the wetlands at issue in this case, which had been filled without permits by the farmers to create a cranberry bog. In reconsidering its previous decision in light of Rapanos, the court ruled that the government can establish jurisdiction over the wetlands in question if they meet either the plurality’s literal interpretation of the term “navigable waters,” meaning permanent flowing or standing bodies of water and hydrologically connected neighboring wetlands, or Justice Kennedy’s “substantial nexus” standard. The court thus vacated its earlier decision, 437 F.3d 157 (1st Cir. 2006), 36 ELR 20040, and remanded the case to the district court for any additional fact-finding necessary to address the jurisdictional question. United States v. Johnson, No. 05-1444, 36 ELR 20218 (1st Cir. Oct. 31, 2006) (25 pp.).

CERCLA, NATURAL RESOURCE DAMAGES:

The Tenth Circuit held that New Mexico may not go forward with their state law claims for natural resource damages (NRDs) against two companies for groundwater contamination at the South Valley Superfund site. CERCLA’s NRD scheme preempts any state remedy designed to achieve something other than the restoration, replacement, or acquisition of the equivalent of a contaminated natural resource. In addition, the state's argument that the remedial phase of the cleanup does not address the entirety of the contamination and will not restore the groundwater to beneficial use as drinking water is a challenge to an EPA-ordered remediation, and the state may not challenge the cleanup prior to completion of the remedy. Because the state may not achieve indirectly through the threat of monetary damages, which would be available only to restore or replace the injured natural resource, what it cannot obtain directly through mandatory injunctive relief incompatible with the ongoing CERCLA-mandated remediation, its claims were dismissed. New Mexico v. General Electric Co., No. 04-2191, 36 ELR 20219 (10th Cir. Oct. 31, 2006) (55 pp.).

FOIA, DELIBERATIVE-PROCESS PRIVILGE:

A district court held that the DOI need not release certain documents to a nonprofit group relating to the National Park Service's (NPS') proposal to enter into "benefits sharing" agreements with private parties permitting the collection and commercial use of biological materials from national parks. The disputed documents were considered, but not used, in an EIS prepared for the agreement. Because their release would reveal the editorial judgment of NPS staff, the documents are exempt from disclosure under the deliberative-process privilege under FOIA Exemption 5. However, the group is entitled to a public-interest fee waiver for the documents that were released under its FOIA request. Edmonds Institute v. U.S. Department of Interior, No. 04-1560, 36 ELR 20220 (D.D.C. Oct. 30, 2006) (Bates, J.) (19 pp.).

SEWAGE, CONSTITUTIONAL LAW, PREEMPTION:

A district court granted in part and denied in part motions to dismiss a lawsuit challenging a local ballot initiative that prohibits the land application of sewage treatment residues in the unincorporated areas of a county. A city that generates the biosolids, as well as farms and contractors who recycle and use the biosolids for fertilizer in the county, properly stated a claim for a Commerce Clause violation because they alleged that the initiative impermissibly discriminates against interstate commerce. Likewise, their equal protection claim may go forward because they alleged that the initiative actually harms the environment rather than helps it and was enacted for the improper purpose of legislating “anti-Los Angeles” sentiment. They also adequately stated a claim for preemption by the California Integrated Waste Management Act because that statute expresses a mandatory policy of recycling biosolids before other methods of disposal. Finally, they stated a claim for invalid exercise of police power because they properly alleged that initiative's adverse impact on the region as a whole outweighs its putative local benefits. However, they failed to state a claim for preemption under the CWA or the California Water Code because neither statute mandates that land application of biosolids be used before other methods of disposal. City of Los Angeles v. County of Kern, No. CV 06 5094 GAF, 36 ELR 20221 (C.D. Cal. Oct. 24, 2006) (Feess, J.) (13 pp.).

NEPA, OIL AND GAS DRILLING:

A district court granted in part and denied in part cross-motions for summary judgment in a case challenging the National Park Service's (NPS') decision to exempt from agency oversight directional drilling activities in and around Big Thicket National Preserve in Texas. Directional drilling refers to the practice of drilling at a slant adjacent to and outside of park boundaries to extract privately owned oil and gas from beneath the park unit surface. Directional drilling may be exempt from NPS oversight if a regional director determines that the operations within a park unit pose no significant threat of damage to park resources. Here, the administrative records demonstrate that for each of the three challenged decisions, NPS did consider impacts on the Big Thicket National Preserve from surface drilling activities outside the Preserve pursuant to its obligations under the Organic Act and NEPA. However, NPS' ultimate conclusions that the drilling activities would not result in impairment of park resources and values under the Organic Act, or a significant impact on the human environment under NEPA, are not supported by reasoned explanations and, hence, are arbitrary and capricious and an abuse of discretion. On remand, the NPS must prepare an EA for each site. Sierra Club v. Mainella, No. 04-2012, 36 ELR 20222 (D.D.C. Oct. 25, 2006) (Bates, J.) (53 pp.).

Copyright© 2006, Environmental Law Institute, Washington, D.C. All rights reserved.

THE FEDERAL AGENCIES

Note: Citations below are to the Federal Register (FR).

AIR:

  • EPA proposed to allocate essential use allowances for the import and production of class I stratospheric ozone depleting substances for calendar year 2007. 71 FR 64668 (11/3/06).
  • EPA finalized its determination that the San Joaquin Valley nonattainment area in California has attained NAAQS for particulate matter (PM) with a diameter of 10 microns or less. 71 FR 63641 (10/30/06).
  • SIP Approvals: California (volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from organic liquid storage and transfer facilities) 71 FR 63694 (10/31/06); (VOC emissions from the usage of solvents) 71 FR 63696 (10/31/06). Colorado (class I visibility protection) 71 FR 64565 (11/2/06). Indiana (ambient air quality standards amendment and reference update) 71 FR 63699 (10/31/06). Louisiana (transportation conformity) 71 FR 63247 (10/30/06). Maryland (nitrogen oxides (NOx) allowance allocations) 71 FR 64647 (11/3/06). Nevada (PM emissions from fugitive dust sources) 71 FR 63250 (10/30/06). Utah (administrative code revisions) 71 FR 64125 (11/1/06). West Virginia (PSD air quality permit program) 71 FR 64470 (11/2/06); (new source review air quality permit program) 71 FR 64468 (11/2/06). Wyoming (format revision) 71 FR 64460 (11/2/06).
  • SIP Proposals: California (permitting requirements) 71 FR 63738 (10/31/06). Indiana (ambient air quality standards amendment and reference update; see above for direct final rule) 71 FR 63737 (10/31/06). Louisiana (transportation conformity; see above for direct final rule) 71 FR 63275 (10/30/06). Maryland (NOx allowance allocations; see above for direct final rule) 71 FR 68668 (11/3/06). Nevada (PM emissions from fugitive dust sources; see above for direct final rule) 71 FR 63275 (10/30/06). Utah (administrative code revisions; see above for direct final rule) 71 FR 64182 (11/1/06).

HAZARDOUS & SOLID WASTE:

  • EPA entered into settlement agreements under CERCLA for reimbursement of past response costs incurred at the Constitution Road Drum Superfund site in Atlanta, Georgia. 71 FR 64269, 71 FR 64270, 71 FR 64271 (11/1/06).
  • EPA entered into a settlement agreement under CERCLA for reimbursement of past response costs incurred at the DSI Facility Superfund site in Biloxi, Mississippi. 71 FR 64270 (11/1/06).
  • EPA entered into a proposed agreement under CERCLA concerning the Modena Yard Superfund site in Chester County, Pennsylvania, that would require the settling party to pay $150,000 in response costs. 71 FR 64271 (11/1/06).
  • EPA entered into a settlement agreement under CERCLA for reimbursement of past response costs incurred at the Second Melts Acid Spill Superfund site in Lithonia, Georgia. 71 FR 64272 (11/1/06).
  • EPA entered into a settlement agreement under CERCLA for reimbursement of past response costs incurred at the Tindall Property Superfund site in Lawrenceburg, Kentucky. 71 FR 64273 (11/1/06).
  • EPA entered into a proposed agreement under CERCLA concerning the Empire Canyon Superfund site in Park City, Utah, that requires the settling party to pay $38,000 into a special account for the cleanup and transport of historic mine waste to the Richardson Flat Superfund site in Utah. 71 FR 63759 (10/31/06).
  • EPA entered into a proposed administrative settlement under CERCLA concerning the La Costex Refinery Superfund site in La Coste, Texas, that requires the settling party to pay $100,000.00 for reimbursement of past response costs to the EPA Hazardous Substance Superfund. 71 FR 63321 (10/30/06).
  • EPA authorized changes to the state of Washington's hazardous waste program under RCRA. 71 FR 63253 (10/30/06).
  • EPA proposed to authorize changes to the state of Washington's hazardous waste program under RCRA; see above for immediate final rule. 71 FR 63276 (10/30/06).

TOXIC SUBSTANCES:

  • OSHA amended its final rule governing occupational exposure to hexavalent chromium in general industry, which was promulgated on February 28, 2006 (71 FR 10099). 71 FR 63238 (10/30/06).

WATER:

  • EPA determined that the Northern Tug Hill Glacial Aquifer is the sole or principal source of drinking water for various areas of New York and if contaminated would create a significant hazard to public health; as a result, all federal financially assisted projects constructed in the aquifer area and its stream flow source zone will be subject to Agency review to ensure that these projects are designed and constructed so they do not create a significant hazard to public health. 71 FR 64524 (11/2/06).
  • EPA approved revisions to Virginia's Public Water System Supervision Program. 71 FR 63321 (10/30/06).

WILDLIFE:

  • FWS announced the availability of the record of decision for the final comprehensive conservation plan and EIS for the Sweetwater Marsh and South San Diego Bay Units of the San Diego Bay National Wildlife Refuge in California. 71 FR 64552 (11/2/06).
  • FWS designated critical habitat in Oregon and Washington for the Fender's blue butterfly, the Kincaid's lupine, and the Willamette daisy. 71 FR 63861 (10/31/06).
  • FWS proposed to revise critical habitat for the endangered Cape Sable seaside sparrow; the proposed habitat is located in Miami-Dade and Monroe counties, Florida. 71 FR 63979 (10/31/06).

MISCELLANEOUS:

  • NOAA announced the establishment of the NOAA Climate Change Science Program Product Development Committee for Synthesis and Assessment Product 1.3; the Committee will function solely as an advisory body and consist of no more than 20 members. 71 FR 64511 (11/2/06).

Copyright© 2006, Environmental Law Institute, Washington, D.C. All rights reserved.

THE CONGRESS

Congress is currently in recess but will reconvene on November 9, 2006.

Copyright© 2006, Environmental Law Institute, Washington, D.C. All rights reserved.

IN THE STATES

Note: The entries below cover state developments since the last issue of Update. The entries are arranged by state, and within each section, entries are further subdivided by subject matter area. For a cumulative listing of materials reported in 2006, visit our list of Cumulative State Developments Arranged by State, or our list of Cumulative State Developments Arranged by Subject Matter. For state material reported prior to 2006, visit the ELR Archives.

The states below have updates this week:

Alaska Maryland New Hampshire Oregon Arkansas Massachusetts New Jersey South Carolina Colorado Minnesota New Mexico Utah Delaware Missouri North Carolina Washington Illinois Montana Oklahoma West Virginia

ALASKA

Fisheries:

ARKANSAS

Water:

  • The Arkansas Pollution Control and Ecology Commission will hold 10 public hearings during November and December 2006 and January 2007 to receive public comments on proposed changes to Commission Regulation No. 2 (Arkansas Water Quality Standards) developed through the Triennial Review process initiated earlier this year. Copies of the proposed changes are available at http://www.adeq.state.ar.us. See http://www.adeq.state.ar.us/poa/pa/pn_reg_notice.asp

COLORADO

Air:

  • The Air Quality Control Commission will hold a public hearing to consider the adoption of changes U.S. EPA made to its NESHAP rules to revise Regulation Number 8, Part E--Control of Hazardous Air Pollutants (MACT Standards). The hearing will be held January 18 and 19, 2007. See http://www.cdphe.state.co.us/op/aqcc/aqccdown/noticereg8jan.pdf
  • The Air Quality Control Commission will hold a public hearing to consider proposed changes to Regulation Number 19 to add provisions that would implement the federal program for contractor notification to homeowners of lead-based paint remediation. The hearing will be held January 18 and 19, 2007. See http://www.cdphe.state.co.us/op/aqcc/aqccdown/noticereg19jan.pdf

Water:

DELAWARE

Air:

  • The Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control will conduct a public hearing on the proposed control of volatile organic compounds emission from lightering operations. The proposal is to add a new section, Section 46, Crude Oil Lightering Operations, to Regulation No.1124, Control of Volatile Organic Compound Emissions. The hearing will be held December 4, 2006. See http://www.dnrec.state.de.us/DNREC2000/Admin/Press/PublicNotices/PNDetail.asp?NOVID=2121

ILLINOIS

General:

MARYLAND

Fisheries:

  • On October 17, 2006, the Secretary of Natural Resources adopted the repeal of existing Regulations .01 and .02 and adopted new Regulations .01 through .06 under COMAR 08.02.19, Nuisance and Prohibited Species. These changes will become effective November 6, 2006. See http://www.dsd.state.md.us/mdregister/3322/main_register.htm
  • The Secretary of Health and Mental Hygiene will hold a public hearing on proposed amendments to Regulations .01 through .03 and adopt new Regulations .01-1 and .04 through .07 under COMAR 26.20.10, Areas Where Mining is Prohibited or Limited. The hearing will be held November 27, 2006. Comments are due November 27, 2006. See http://www.dsd.state.md.us/mdregister/3322/main_register.htm

MASSACHUSETTS

Air:

  • The Department of Environmental Protection will hold a series of public hearings on the Clean Air Mercury Rule Massachusetts State Plan. The goal of the proposed amendments is to implement the requirements of the federal Clean Air Mercury Rule promulgated by U.S. EPA on May 18, 2005. The hearings will be held November 20 and 21, 2006. Comments are due December 1, 2006. See http://www.mass.gov/dep/public/depcal.htm

MINNESOTA

Water:

MISSOURI

Air:

  • The Air Conservation Commission will hold a public hearing on proposed amendments to 10 CSR 10-6.062, Construction Permits by Rule. The commission proposes to amend subsection (3)(A). This rule creates a process by which sources can be exempt from 10 CSR 10-6.060, Construction Permits Required, by establishing conditions under which specific sources can construct and operate. The hearing will be held December 7, 2006. See http://www.sos.mo.gov/adrules/moreg/current/2006/v31n21/v31n21b.pdf
  • The Air Conservation Commission will hold a public hearing on proposed amendments to 10 CSR 10-6.350, Emission Limitations and Emissions Trading of Oxides of Nitrogen. The commission proposes to add new subsections (1)(E) and (1)(F). The hearing will be held December 7, 2006. See http://www.sos.mo.gov/adrules/moreg/current/2006/v31n21/v31n21b.pdf (p. 1766 )
  • The Air Conservation Commission will hold a public hearing on proposed 10 CSR 10-6.360, Control of NOx Emissions From Electric Generating Units and Non-Electric Generating Boilers. The commission proposes to amend subsections (1)(B) and (4)(E) and to add new subsection (1)(H). This rule reduces emissions of oxides of nitrogen (NOx) to ensure compliance with the federal NOx control plan to reduce the transport of air pollutants. The hearing will be held December 7, 2006. See http://www.sos.mo.gov/adrules/moreg/current/2006/v31n21/v31n21b.pdf (p. 1769)

Wildlife:

  • The Conservation Commission is soliciting public comment on proposed amendments to 3 CSR 10-4.117, Prohibited Species. The commission proposes to amend subsection (2)(D), which adds mysterysnails of the genus Cipangopaludina to the list of species that may not be possessed in Missouri. Comments are due November 30, 2006. See http://www.sos.mo.gov/adrules/moreg/current/2006/v31n21/v31n21a.pdf (p. 1703)
  • The Conservation Commission is soliciting public comment on proposed 3 CSR 10-4.145, Preparing and Serving Wildlife. The commission proposes to amend section (1), which corrects a reference that wildlife labeling requirements apply to the taker of such wildlife, including the Telecheck confirmation number. Comments are due November 30, 2006. See http://www.sos.mo.gov/adrules/moreg/current/2006/v31n21/v31n21a.pdf (p. 1703)

MONTANA

Air:

  • The Board of Environmental Review amended air quality regulations ARM 17.8.740 and 17.8.767, pertaining to definitions and incorporation by reference, and adopted new rules I and II, pertaining to mercury emission standards and mercury emission credit allocations. See http://sos.mt.gov/arm/Register/archives/MAR2006/MAR06-20.pdf (p. 2575)

Hazardous and Solid Waste :

  • The Department of Environmental Quality will hold a public hearing in the matter of the amendment of ARM 17.50.213 pertaining to reimbursement payments for abandoned vehicle removal .The hearing will be held November 27, 2006. See
    http://sos.mt.gov/arm/Register/archives/MAR2006/MAR06-20.pdf (p. 2444)

NEW HAMPSHIRE

Hazardous and Solid Waste:

  • The Department of Environmental Services will hold a public hearing on the proposal to adopt revisions to Env-Wm 110.01(c) as regular rules. Env-Wm 110.01(c) set forth definitions relating to the generation, storage, transportation, and disposal of hazardous waste. The rules were amended by interim rules to reflect revisions to the hazardous waste manifest requirements, including definitions, that were adopted by U.S. EPA. The hearing will be held November 20, 2006. See http://www.des.state.nh.us/RuleMaking/notice2006/Env-Wm110ManifestsRMN.pdf
  • The Department of Environmental Services will hold a public hearing on the proposal to adopted revisions to ENV-Wm 400-1100 as regular rules. The rules in Env-Wm 400-1100 set forth requirements relating to the generation, storage, transportation, and disposal of hazardous waste. The rules were amended by interim rules to reflect revisions to the hazardous waste manifest requirements that have been adopted by U.S. EPA. The hearing will be held November 20, 2006. Comments are due November 30, 2006. See http://www.des.state.nh.us/RuleMaking/notice2006/Env-Wm_misc_ManifestsRMN.pdf
  • The Department of Environmental Services will hold a public hearing on proposed rule Env-Or 800, which proposes new rules to supplement the procedures for implementation of the Brownfields Program (RSA 147-F) that are specified in the statute, including eligibility criteria, application procedures, fee structure, and program participation requirements. These rules also supplement the procedures established in RSA 147-F for the application of the remedial process for the voluntary cleanup of contaminated properties. The hearing will be held November 14, 2006. See http://www.des.state.nh.us/RuleMaking/notice2006/Env-Or800RMN.pdf
  • The Department of Environmental Services will hold a public hearing on proposed amendments to Env-Or 600, Contaminated Site Management, and Env-Or 700, Groundwater Release Detection Permits. The hearing will be held November 14, 2006. Comments are due November 27, 2006. See http://www.des.state.nh.us/RuleMaking/notice2006/Env-Or600-700RMN.pdf

Water:

  • The Department of Environmental Services will hold a public hearing on proposed amendments to Env-Wt 800. The existing rules in Env-Wt 800 establish criteria and procedures for submittal and review of compensatory mitigation proposals to restore or create wetlands or to preserve upland buffers to compensate for the loss of wetland functions and values. The proposed amendments are intended to reflect the statutory changes of RSA 482-A:28-33, which authorize the Department to accept payment of funds in lieu of restoration, creation, or preservation that can be pooled with similar payments from other projects. The hearing will be held November 17, 2006. See http://www.des.state.nh.us/RuleMaking/notice2006/Env-Wt800amdILF_INTERIM_RMN.pdf

NEW JERSEY

Hazardous and Solid Waste:

  • The Department of Environmental Protection will hold a public hearing on proposed rule amendments certain UST rules at N.J.A.C. 7:14B, Industrial Site Recovery Act rules at N.J.A.C. 7:26B, and the Department Oversight of the Remediation of Contaminated Sites rules at N.J.A.C. 7:26C, to adjust the fees for various services provided by the Site Remediation Program.  The hearing will be held December 4, 2006. Comments are due January 5, 2007. See http://www.nj.gov/dep/rules/notices/110606a.htm

NEW MEXICO

Water:

NORTH CAROLINA

Hazardous and Solid Waste:

  • The Commission for Health Services will hold a public hearing on proposed amendments to 15A NCAC 13A .0106 concerning the listing and identification of hazardous wastes. The hearing will be held December 7, 2006. See http://www.ncoah.com/rules/register/Volume21Issue09.pdf (p. 777)

OKLAHOMA

Fisheries:

  • The Department of Wildlife Conservation amended, via emergency action, section 800:15-7-3 of the Oklahoma Administrative Code, concerning general operating provisions for commercial mussel harvesting, to correct a transcription error. The rule is effective through July 17, 2007. See http://www.oar.state.ok.us/register/Volume-24_Issue-04.htm

OREGON

Land Use:

SOUTH CAROLINA

Air:

  • The South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control amended S.C. Regulation 61-62, Air Pollution Control Regulations and Standards, and the South Carolina SIP to incorporate revisions in the federally approved state minor source permitting program. See http://www.scdhec.gov/administration/regs/docs/regupdate.doc#air

UTAH

Toxic Substances:

  • The Department of Environmental Quality, Radiation Control, has adopted amendments to R313-19. The change is in regard to the requirements for financial assurance for decommissioning of facilities with certain quantities of radioactive materials. The rule became effective October 20, 2006. See http://www.rules.utah.gov/publicat/bulletin/2006/20060901/28922.htm

Fisheries:

WASHINGTON

Toxic Substances:

  • The Department of Ecology has adopted Facility Oil Handling Standards, Chapter 173-180 WAC, and Vessel Oil Transfer Advance Notice and Transfer Containment Standards, Chapter 127-184 WAC. See http://www.ecy.wa.gov/biblio/0608028.html
  • The Department of Ecology has adopted Oil Spill Contingency Plan Rules, Chapter 173-182 WAC. These rules became effective October 26, 2006. See http://www.ecy.wa.gov/biblio/0608030.html

Water:

  • The Department of Ecology has adopted amendments to Chapter 173-153 WAC, Water Conservancy Boards. The purpose of this rule is to establish procedures that the Department, water conservancy boards, applicants, concerned agencies, and the public will follow in implementing Chapter 90.80 RCW, which authorizes the establishment of water conservancy boards and vests them with certain powers related to water right transfers. The amendments became effective October 7, 2006. See http://www.ecy.wa.gov/pubs/0611027.pdf

WEST VIRGINIA

Toxic Substances:

  • The West Virginia Department of Environmental Protection will hold a public meeting and hearing to provide updated information on the status of its mercury study and make a final finding pursuant to W. Va. Code 64-3-3. See http://www.wvsos.com/adlaw/register/current/102706.pdf

 

Copyright© 2006, Environmental Law Institute, Washington, D.C. All rights reserved.

INTERNATIONAL

ARGENTINA ALLEGES VIOLATION OF BILATERIAL TREATY ON URUGUAY RIVER

Argentina’s top environmental official has asked the World Bank to cut loans for a pulp mill in neighboring Uruguay until an international court has ruled in a case Argentina brought against the project. The pulp mill is being constructed alongside the Uruguay River, which runs along the border of the two countries. This construction has sparked a diplomatic dispute that reached the International Court of Justice in The Hague; Argentina has accused Uruguay of violating a bilateral treaty on the Uruguay River by not providing sufficient information on the pulp mill project. The Hague has not ordered the construction to halt, but a broader decision is not expected until late next year. The World Bank's private-sector lender and guarantee agency say they would recommend financing for the project after determining it meets their environmental and social standards.
See http://today.reuters.com/News/CrisesArticle.aspx?storyId=N30421191

AUSTRIALIA PUSHES FOR ASIA-WIDE EMISSIONS TRADING

After repeatedly blocking domestic carbon trading, Australia said it will now support a “New-Kyoto” pact that sanctions Asia-wide emissions trading to combat global warming. The turn-around by Australia, which refuses to sign the Kyoto Protocol, is the result of an opinion poll that showed most Australians believe the government should sign Kyoto. Environment Minister Ian Campbell said Australia wanted to create a six-nation alliance of the world's biggest polluters--Australia, China, India, Japan, South Korea, and the United States. See http://today.reuters.com/news/articlenews.aspx?type=scienceNews&storyID=2006-11-02T054911Z_01_SYD20335_RTRUKOC_0_US-ENVIRONMENT-AUSTRALIA.xml&WTmodLoc=NewsHome-C3-scienceNews-3

ETHIOPIAN CITY REQUIRES ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENTS FOR LAND DEALS

The Lease Board of the Addis Abeba Caretaker Administration has launched a new policy that requires Environmental Impact Assessments (EIAs) for investment projects that request land from the city administration. The EIA will gather information as soon as requests for land are received, and will help keep track of what type of land will be used. The new policy seeks to improve the environmental condition of the city of Addis Abeba. See http://allafrica.com/stories/200610240645.html

 

Copyright© 2006, Environmental Law Institute, Washington, D.C. All rights reserved.

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