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Research Reports

ELI publishes Research Reports available for free download that present the analysis and conclusions of the policy studies ELI undertakes to improve environmental law and policy. These reports contribute to education of the profession and disseminate diverse points of view and opinions to stimulate a robust and creative exchange of ideas. Those publications, which express opinions of the authors and not necessarily those of the Institute, its Board of Directors, or funding organizations, exemplify ELI’s commitment to dialogue with all sectors.

ELI Research Brief #1 - New Uses for Old Tools: Protecting Biodiversity and Preventing Pollution Under Existing Laws

John Pendergrass, Environmental Law Institute
December 1993

Pollution prevention, rather than "end of the pipe" treatment of effluent, has recently emerged as the preferred strategy in the reduction of industrial emissions. By signing the Biodiversity Treaty in 1993, President Clinton signaled U.S. recognition that protecting the global ecosystem is one of the planet`s principal challenges. New Uses for Old Tools demonstrates that the U.S. EPA can accomplish these goals without the addition of new regulations or laws. Read More >

ELI Research Brief #2 - Reauthorizing Superfund: Lessons from the States

James M. McElfish Jr. & John Pendergrass, Environmental Law Institute
December 1993

Forty-nine U.S. states have individual "Superfund Laws" providing for the cleanup of hazardous sites through combinations of liability and public funding. The conclusion of this research brief is that as Congress considers amendments to the federal Superfund law, it should draw on the experiences of the states. Reauthorizing Superfund discusses and summarizes the key lessons from four comprehensive ELI studies on state superfund programs. Read More >

Facility Inspections Under a Water Discharge Permitting Program

Margaret Bowman, Environmental Law Institute
December 1993

Information Access Mechanisms: Collecting & Disseminating the Information Necessary for Environmental Protection

Margaret Bowman, Environmental Law Institute
December 1993

This process of interaction and mutual influence among various groups within a society -- the public, business interests, and government -- characterizes a functioning democratic system. Yet such effective interaction is impossible without the free exchange of full and accurate information that can form the basis of individual and collective changes in behavior. Access to information -- in the context of legal and social structures that are conducive to constructive change -- thus fuels the democratic process, in environmental protection as in other aspects of self-government. Read More >

Nongovernmental Perspectives on EPA's Options for Protection of Habitat

James M. McElfish Jr., Environmental Law Institute
December 1993

On November 23, 1992, under the sponsorship of EPA`s Habitat Cluster, representatives from 25 environmental and conservation organizations were convened by the Environmental Law Institute to consider EPA`s options for protection of habitat. The organizations included not only the national environmental groups, but also representatives of regional groups and coalitions, and organizations that have a focus on conservation, planning, or particular resources. Read More >