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The Environmental Impact of 3D Printing

December 13, 2013

Cosponsored by the Woodrow Wilson Center's Environmental Change & Security Program

3D printing allows for cheaper and quicker production of complex and novel items. The technology has been used by industry to build prototypes and specialized parts since the 1980s, but interest in desktop applications of the technology has increased in recent years as the price for the machines has dropped.

Proponents of the technology often cite the environmental benefits of 3D printing, though fundamental questions remain: What technologies are involved in 3D printing? How efficient are these technologies in the use of materials and energy? Does the design of printed objects reduce end-of-life options? Does more localized production reduce the carbon footprint? Will simplicity and ubiquity cause us to overprint things, just as we do with paper?

Robert L. Olson explored some of these questions in his article "3D Printing: A Boon or a Bane?" in the November/December 2013 issue of The Environmental Forum. The article discusses the enormous potential of 3D printing and examines the paucity of research on the environmental impacts of the technology.

Speakers:
Robert Olson, Senior Fellow, Institute for Alternative Futures, Woodrow Wilson Center
David Rejeski, Director, Science and Technology Innovation Program, Woodrow Wilson Center